Mitsi brings best features together in the new Pajero

Mitsubishi has broken a lot of new ground with the Pajero Sport.

Mitsubishi has broken a lot of new ground with the Pajero Sport.

MITSUBISHI has really gone for gold with the launch of the new Pajero Sport, the most advanced Mitsubishi yet — producing an SUV vehicle that merges improved performance with luxury and includes a number of firsts and improvements for a vehicle that looks you in the eye and says “yes I am a big wagon.”

Mitsubishi has broken a lot of new ground with the Pajero Sport with firsts like a new eight-speed transmission, electric parking brake, a high centre console, blind spot warning system, hill descent control and four off-road modes.

The Pajero Sport comes in two models, the entry level XLS and the upgraded VRX five-seater used for the test drive.

The 2.4 litre D4 DOHC MIVEC diesel engine is the same as used for the mighty Triton and has peak power of 135kW and 437 Nm of torque. It has efficiency systems to keep fuel consumption to a claimed 8 litres/100km, low for a vehicle this size

Mitsubishi claims a class-leading braked towing capacity of 3100kg backed by extras like trailer stability assist and the super select four-wheel-drive capability.

In another innovation, the off-road mode system has four modes to select from — gravel, mud-snow, sand and rock, and can be tailored to any surface. The hill descent system, which stabilises the vehicle when driving down a steep gradient to allow the driver to concentrate fully on steering, is another asset.

That off-road capability was recently proven on the demanding off-road course the army uses at Waiouru, which has proved too hard for many vehicles but which the Pajero handled comfortably. This is also the first Mitsubishi with hill descent control.

The Pajero has a blind spot warning system. The VRX has a reversing camera with a multi-view monitor that gives a bird’s eye view of the surroundings, and a forward collision mitigation system.

There is also an ultrasonic mis-acceleration system. If the vehicle is stopped or is moving slowly, it restrains the engine if the accelerator is stepped on quickly, something that would have been welcome in the Whangarei store shown on television recently.

The eight-speed transmission gives much-improved acceleration, a closer ratio between the gears, a greater gear range spread and a higher gear ratio in the top gears, which improves the fuel economy.

An extensive range of sound absorbers, body mounts, insulation and vibration damping materials all come together to make the Pajero Sport extremely quiet on the road.

The interior design is European class, packed with leather and multiple comfort features.

A sophisticated exterior design is based around the dynamic shield front fascia that is intended to be the hallmark of all Mitsubishi vehicles. As usual, Mitsubishi’s highly regarded 10-year warranty is available.

Released just this month, the new Pajero Sport really is hot off the press and ready to make headlines.

MITSUBISHI has really gone for gold with the launch of the new Pajero Sport, the most advanced Mitsubishi yet — producing an SUV vehicle that merges improved performance with luxury and includes a number of firsts and improvements for a vehicle that looks you in the eye and says “yes I am a big wagon.”

Mitsubishi has broken a lot of new ground with the Pajero Sport with firsts like a new eight-speed transmission, electric parking brake, a high centre console, blind spot warning system, hill descent control and four off-road modes.

The Pajero Sport comes in two models, the entry level XLS and the upgraded VRX five-seater used for the test drive.

The 2.4 litre D4 DOHC MIVEC diesel engine is the same as used for the mighty Triton and has peak power of 135kW and 437 Nm of torque. It has efficiency systems to keep fuel consumption to a claimed 8 litres/100km, low for a vehicle this size

Mitsubishi claims a class-leading braked towing capacity of 3100kg backed by extras like trailer stability assist and the super select four-wheel-drive capability.

In another innovation, the off-road mode system has four modes to select from — gravel, mud-snow, sand and rock, and can be tailored to any surface. The hill descent system, which stabilises the vehicle when driving down a steep gradient to allow the driver to concentrate fully on steering, is another asset.

That off-road capability was recently proven on the demanding off-road course the army uses at Waiouru, which has proved too hard for many vehicles but which the Pajero handled comfortably. This is also the first Mitsubishi with hill descent control.

The Pajero has a blind spot warning system. The VRX has a reversing camera with a multi-view monitor that gives a bird’s eye view of the surroundings, and a forward collision mitigation system.

There is also an ultrasonic mis-acceleration system. If the vehicle is stopped or is moving slowly, it restrains the engine if the accelerator is stepped on quickly, something that would have been welcome in the Whangarei store shown on television recently.

The eight-speed transmission gives much-improved acceleration, a closer ratio between the gears, a greater gear range spread and a higher gear ratio in the top gears, which improves the fuel economy.

An extensive range of sound absorbers, body mounts, insulation and vibration damping materials all come together to make the Pajero Sport extremely quiet on the road.

The interior design is European class, packed with leather and multiple comfort features.

A sophisticated exterior design is based around the dynamic shield front fascia that is intended to be the hallmark of all Mitsubishi vehicles. As usual, Mitsubishi’s highly regarded 10-year warranty is available.

Released just this month, the new Pajero Sport really is hot off the press and ready to make headlines.

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