It's the min DB1

MAKE way for a Mini revival. British design company David Brown Automotive has launched the Mini Remastered.

This £70,000 (NZ$125, 672) coach-built update of the original Mini is a different proposition from the £594,000 GT, inspired by the famed Aston Martin DB5, that the company has also revised.

The Mini provides the perfect enterprise for a coach builder, given that the original was, as David Brown puts it, “the ultimate in packaging”. The company is gearing up for full production next year of 100 Minis at its new HQ in Silverstone.

While the 1275cc engine and four-speed gearbox are reconditioned originals, the chassis and body panels are new. The latter have been “de-seamed”, to create a different look, with smooth surfaces stretching round the car’s four corners.

Three trim variants are offered, although by its nature as a coach-built car the options are almost endless.

While the standard model offers the cleanest design inside and out, there are also Monte Carlo and Cafe Racer derivatives, shown with redundant but aesthetically-pleasing leather-embossed bonnet straps, more fanciful interiors and, in the case of the Monte Carlo design, triple LED headlights aping the original.

Externally, DBA’s touch includes triple LED lights at the rear, enamel DBA badges and the DBA family grille taken from the Speedster.

Inside, there is most stuff you would expect from a new car — Apple CarPlay, Bluetooth, USB connectivity and a Pioneer touchscreen featuring infotainment and satnav choices come as standard.

The switches and indicator stalks are finished in knurled aluminium and the nickel buttons are cool to the touch.

Every customer will get a “one-to-one design consultation”, where they will have an almost endless choice of colours and materials, and the power can be uprated.

The leather is British-sourced, and the air vents and luggage rails are chrome.

“It was a challenge to stay true to the original,”said Brown at the unveiling.

“It’s a great piece of engineering and design. True fans might admire it from a design point of view,” said Brown.

“The Mini was a fantastic concept, poorly put together.”

MAKE way for a Mini revival. British design company David Brown Automotive has launched the Mini Remastered.

This £70,000 (NZ$125, 672) coach-built update of the original Mini is a different proposition from the £594,000 GT, inspired by the famed Aston Martin DB5, that the company has also revised.

The Mini provides the perfect enterprise for a coach builder, given that the original was, as David Brown puts it, “the ultimate in packaging”. The company is gearing up for full production next year of 100 Minis at its new HQ in Silverstone.

While the 1275cc engine and four-speed gearbox are reconditioned originals, the chassis and body panels are new. The latter have been “de-seamed”, to create a different look, with smooth surfaces stretching round the car’s four corners.

Three trim variants are offered, although by its nature as a coach-built car the options are almost endless.

While the standard model offers the cleanest design inside and out, there are also Monte Carlo and Cafe Racer derivatives, shown with redundant but aesthetically-pleasing leather-embossed bonnet straps, more fanciful interiors and, in the case of the Monte Carlo design, triple LED headlights aping the original.

Externally, DBA’s touch includes triple LED lights at the rear, enamel DBA badges and the DBA family grille taken from the Speedster.

Inside, there is most stuff you would expect from a new car — Apple CarPlay, Bluetooth, USB connectivity and a Pioneer touchscreen featuring infotainment and satnav choices come as standard.

The switches and indicator stalks are finished in knurled aluminium and the nickel buttons are cool to the touch.

Every customer will get a “one-to-one design consultation”, where they will have an almost endless choice of colours and materials, and the power can be uprated.

The leather is British-sourced, and the air vents and luggage rails are chrome.

“It was a challenge to stay true to the original,”said Brown at the unveiling.

“It’s a great piece of engineering and design. True fans might admire it from a design point of view,” said Brown.

“The Mini was a fantastic concept, poorly put together.”

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