Mazda’s CX-5 . . . with extras

MAZDA has added a whole new level of refinement to its CX-5 SUV, following the maxim of if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

The CX-5 is already the preferred SUV for private buyers, so the Japanese car maker did not need a complete makeover. But what they have achieved is striking in ways not immediately apparent, but become more and more obvious in a test drive in the 2.5 litre petrol GSX.

Take the sound deadening. Things like acoustic glass in the front side windows, a third layer of sealing between the doors and around the tailgate, plus extra rubber to close the gap between door handles and door panels virtually eliminate vibrations and wind noise to the extent that you could almost rename it the Mazda Mute.

That adds greatly to the sense of refinement of the vehicle and is particularly noticeable on the heavy chip used on local roads.

Then there is the active driving display that allows the driver to get a whole range of information in a pop-up screen that appears in the windscreen which means you can look straight ahead and not be distracted. It also has traffic sign recognition.

The rear view camera now has a larger display and is supported by blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert, two features that will cost panelbeaters millions.

Along with that there is the advanced smart city brake support that will actually brake for you if necessary. The Mazda radar cruise control will bring the car to a complete stop in traffic and then take off again when the traffic begins to move.

It does not stop there. One of the main features of the range is that all the new CX-5s have G vectoring control, which ensures that you take the smoothest line possible when cornering. It is another example of how the CX-5 does the thinking for you.

The GSX is one of a range of six models in the new CX-5 fleet, four petrol and two diesel, with front and all-wheel-drive options.

Its 2.5 litre, in-line four-cylinder engine has maximum power of 140kW at 6000 rpm, maximum torque of 251 Nm at 4000 rpm and a six-speed automatic transmission with sport mode drive selection. With the help of i-stop, which switches the motor off when the vehicle stops, you get a combined fuel consumption of 7.5 litres/100km.

Then there is the six-speaker audio system with internet radio integration and voice activation and control, another level of refinement in a sophisticated vehicle.

The battle for the SUV market has become something of an arms race between the different car makers and Mazda has made sure it is not caught out but is actually moving forward.

MAZDA has added a whole new level of refinement to its CX-5 SUV, following the maxim of if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

The CX-5 is already the preferred SUV for private buyers, so the Japanese car maker did not need a complete makeover. But what they have achieved is striking in ways not immediately apparent, but become more and more obvious in a test drive in the 2.5 litre petrol GSX.

Take the sound deadening. Things like acoustic glass in the front side windows, a third layer of sealing between the doors and around the tailgate, plus extra rubber to close the gap between door handles and door panels virtually eliminate vibrations and wind noise to the extent that you could almost rename it the Mazda Mute.

That adds greatly to the sense of refinement of the vehicle and is particularly noticeable on the heavy chip used on local roads.

Then there is the active driving display that allows the driver to get a whole range of information in a pop-up screen that appears in the windscreen which means you can look straight ahead and not be distracted. It also has traffic sign recognition.

The rear view camera now has a larger display and is supported by blind spot monitoring and rear cross traffic alert, two features that will cost panelbeaters millions.

Along with that there is the advanced smart city brake support that will actually brake for you if necessary. The Mazda radar cruise control will bring the car to a complete stop in traffic and then take off again when the traffic begins to move.

It does not stop there. One of the main features of the range is that all the new CX-5s have G vectoring control, which ensures that you take the smoothest line possible when cornering. It is another example of how the CX-5 does the thinking for you.

The GSX is one of a range of six models in the new CX-5 fleet, four petrol and two diesel, with front and all-wheel-drive options.

Its 2.5 litre, in-line four-cylinder engine has maximum power of 140kW at 6000 rpm, maximum torque of 251 Nm at 4000 rpm and a six-speed automatic transmission with sport mode drive selection. With the help of i-stop, which switches the motor off when the vehicle stops, you get a combined fuel consumption of 7.5 litres/100km.

Then there is the six-speaker audio system with internet radio integration and voice activation and control, another level of refinement in a sophisticated vehicle.

The battle for the SUV market has become something of an arms race between the different car makers and Mazda has made sure it is not caught out but is actually moving forward.

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