This car can fly

FROM The Jetsons to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, flying cars have long captured the imagination.

Now one Dutch firm is set to make the technology a reality. PAL-V International said it would begin production of its personal air and land vehicle (Pal-V).

Customers willing to part with a hefty price tag could get their hands on one of the machines as early as next year.

Pal-V is a three-wheeled flying vehicle that can carry two. After years of testing, the company aims to become the world’s first mass manufacturer of a flying car.

Assembly of the NZ$768,000 Pal-V will start in October and the firm, based in Raamsdonksveer in the Netherlands, is aiming to deliver its first flying car to its first customer by the end of 2018.

Chief marketing officer Markus Hess said, ‘‘This kind of dream has been around for 100 years now’’.

In 2019, the company expects to produce between 50 and 100, before ramping up to ‘‘quite a few hundred’’ in 2020.

The firm has designed the car so at the flick of a button the blades fold down and gather like a bat’s wings on the top.

Dutch company Carver insists the Pal-V is not a helicopter, where blades are powered by an engine, but is a gyroplane in which the blades rotate thanks to airflow. Even if both engines cut out, the blades will turn.

Once built, the vehicle will have to complete at least 150 flying hours, and undergo extensive tests to receive its certification from the Cologne-based European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

It will have a flying range of between 400 to 500 kilometres at an altitude of up to 3500 metres. On the road, it can drive for up to 1200 kilometres.

The helicycle has a top speed of around 170kmh and goes from 0 to 100kmh in under eight seconds. It requires a 165 metre runway for take-offs and just 30 metres for landing.

Owners will need both a driving licence and a pilot’s licence. — Daily Mail

FROM The Jetsons to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, flying cars have long captured the imagination.

Now one Dutch firm is set to make the technology a reality. PAL-V International said it would begin production of its personal air and land vehicle (Pal-V).

Customers willing to part with a hefty price tag could get their hands on one of the machines as early as next year.

Pal-V is a three-wheeled flying vehicle that can carry two. After years of testing, the company aims to become the world’s first mass manufacturer of a flying car.

Assembly of the NZ$768,000 Pal-V will start in October and the firm, based in Raamsdonksveer in the Netherlands, is aiming to deliver its first flying car to its first customer by the end of 2018.

Chief marketing officer Markus Hess said, ‘‘This kind of dream has been around for 100 years now’’.

In 2019, the company expects to produce between 50 and 100, before ramping up to ‘‘quite a few hundred’’ in 2020.

The firm has designed the car so at the flick of a button the blades fold down and gather like a bat’s wings on the top.

Dutch company Carver insists the Pal-V is not a helicopter, where blades are powered by an engine, but is a gyroplane in which the blades rotate thanks to airflow. Even if both engines cut out, the blades will turn.

Once built, the vehicle will have to complete at least 150 flying hours, and undergo extensive tests to receive its certification from the Cologne-based European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

It will have a flying range of between 400 to 500 kilometres at an altitude of up to 3500 metres. On the road, it can drive for up to 1200 kilometres.

The helicycle has a top speed of around 170kmh and goes from 0 to 100kmh in under eight seconds. It requires a 165 metre runway for take-offs and just 30 metres for landing.

Owners will need both a driving licence and a pilot’s licence. — Daily Mail

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