Getting checked out

WITH a successful Fieldays behind them, Foton is looking onwards and upwards for its powerful and rugged Tunland utes.

The Chinese manufacturer attracted a lot of admiring looks at the fieldays but it is the appreciation it has been getting from professional and private admirers that shows the respect it is gaining.

The latest favourable review in New Zealand Company Vehicle magazine by editor Ross Mackay said that if you are in the market for a new ute, you owe it to yourself to check out the Tunland.

That comes hard on the heels of a series of reviews where the common theme is that the test driver has been pleasantly surprised by the Tunland and there is much more to them than just “bang for your buck.”

That comes alongside other comments that the Tunland is a well-priced and presented vehicle, a great good-looking ute with a well-presented cabin and definitely not a pig to drive.

Foton’s web page is packed with comments like “ride and handling surprisingly refined”, “pulling power with little turbo lag” and “sure-footed and secure.”

One respondent says he even managed to pull an eight-wheeler stock truck with his Tunland.

The basis for the growing reputation of the Tunland range lies with the mighty Cummins motor. The Tunland is the first light commercial vehicle in the world to be powered by the Cummins ISF engine, the latest edition of Cummins’ legendary range of powerful and reliable engines.

The ISF 2.8-litre four-cylinder intercooled turbo-diesel engine supplies the Tunland with 130kW of power @ 3600rpm and a flat torque curve of 365Nm from 1600rpm to 3200rpm.

The revolutionary design of the ISF balances performance with economy, achieving a combined fuel consumption of 8.3 litres per 100km.

The Tunland combines robust styling with an assertive size to create a considerable on-road presence. The Tunland is available as a dual cab ute in both 4×2 and dual-range 4×4 with limited-slip rear differential and five-speed manual transmission.

WITH a successful Fieldays behind them, Foton is looking onwards and upwards for its powerful and rugged Tunland utes.

The Chinese manufacturer attracted a lot of admiring looks at the fieldays but it is the appreciation it has been getting from professional and private admirers that shows the respect it is gaining.

The latest favourable review in New Zealand Company Vehicle magazine by editor Ross Mackay said that if you are in the market for a new ute, you owe it to yourself to check out the Tunland.

That comes hard on the heels of a series of reviews where the common theme is that the test driver has been pleasantly surprised by the Tunland and there is much more to them than just “bang for your buck.”

That comes alongside other comments that the Tunland is a well-priced and presented vehicle, a great good-looking ute with a well-presented cabin and definitely not a pig to drive.

Foton’s web page is packed with comments like “ride and handling surprisingly refined”, “pulling power with little turbo lag” and “sure-footed and secure.”

One respondent says he even managed to pull an eight-wheeler stock truck with his Tunland.

The basis for the growing reputation of the Tunland range lies with the mighty Cummins motor. The Tunland is the first light commercial vehicle in the world to be powered by the Cummins ISF engine, the latest edition of Cummins’ legendary range of powerful and reliable engines.

The ISF 2.8-litre four-cylinder intercooled turbo-diesel engine supplies the Tunland with 130kW of power @ 3600rpm and a flat torque curve of 365Nm from 1600rpm to 3200rpm.

The revolutionary design of the ISF balances performance with economy, achieving a combined fuel consumption of 8.3 litres per 100km.

The Tunland combines robust styling with an assertive size to create a considerable on-road presence. The Tunland is available as a dual cab ute in both 4×2 and dual-range 4×4 with limited-slip rear differential and five-speed manual transmission.

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