Taking a Tesla charge

TESLA'S supercharger network could eventually be located next to convenience stores, according to the company’s chief technical officer, JB Straubel.

According to Restaurant Business, the Tesla executive made the comments at the FSTEC conference in Californa last week.

“People are coming and spending 20 to 30 minutes at these stops while waiting for their Teslas to recharge,” Straubel said.

Straubel showed an overhead view of a Tesla supercarger station that appears to feature a convenience store or workshop, next to a covered row of charging stations, similar in setup to a conventional petrol station.

“They want to eat, they want to have a cup of coffee, they want to use the bathroom,” Straubel said.

“They’re starting to look a lot like convenience stops. It’s amazing how quickly these things are evolving."

He stressed, however, that Tesla had no interest in expanding its business model to include managing a food service operation. It was more likely Tesla would purse partnerships with existing businesses.

“We have already been working with restaurants,” he said.

“That can only start scaling up.”

Currently, one of the biggest challenges that face full-electric vehicle owners is the time it takes to recharge, and the distance between charging location. So any supporting facilities would make charge times less of a nuisance for early adopters.

Tesla models are capable of recharging up to 50 percent in 20 minutes when plunged into a public fast charge station, and around 75 minutes to reach 100 percent charge.

So far Tesla have established only one supercharge location in New Zealand.

– www.nzherald.co.nz

TESLA'S supercharger network could eventually be located next to convenience stores, according to the company’s chief technical officer, JB Straubel.

According to Restaurant Business, the Tesla executive made the comments at the FSTEC conference in Californa last week.

“People are coming and spending 20 to 30 minutes at these stops while waiting for their Teslas to recharge,” Straubel said.

Straubel showed an overhead view of a Tesla supercarger station that appears to feature a convenience store or workshop, next to a covered row of charging stations, similar in setup to a conventional petrol station.

“They want to eat, they want to have a cup of coffee, they want to use the bathroom,” Straubel said.

“They’re starting to look a lot like convenience stops. It’s amazing how quickly these things are evolving."

He stressed, however, that Tesla had no interest in expanding its business model to include managing a food service operation. It was more likely Tesla would purse partnerships with existing businesses.

“We have already been working with restaurants,” he said.

“That can only start scaling up.”

Currently, one of the biggest challenges that face full-electric vehicle owners is the time it takes to recharge, and the distance between charging location. So any supporting facilities would make charge times less of a nuisance for early adopters.

Tesla models are capable of recharging up to 50 percent in 20 minutes when plunged into a public fast charge station, and around 75 minutes to reach 100 percent charge.

So far Tesla have established only one supercharge location in New Zealand.

– www.nzherald.co.nz

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