Economic action plan being finalised

Future Tairawhiti committee considers options to develop economic activity.

Future Tairawhiti committee considers options to develop economic activity.

THERE is limited time available for Gisborne District Council to come up with ideas for reducing the cost of doing business here and attract government funding for a regional action plan.

The Future Tairawhiti committee considered a number of possibilities for developing economic activity, ranging from a wood processing plant to rates remissions and incentives for new industries to come to the district.

It was reminded in a report from principal adviser Yvette Kinsella that the Government had identified Tairawhiti as one of five regions in a regional growth programme that would support the development and delivery of a plan to improve local economic performance.

What made this programme different from others was that there were eight Cabinet Ministers meeting each month to look at progress on the ground, she said.

District Council chief executive Judy Campbell said the Government wanted an action plan out fairly quickly to go before Cabinet.

The council probably had about a month to respond.

The eventual plan would be prepared with the involvement of central government, the council, iwi, Activate Tairawhiti and business interests.

Potential activities for advancement

This was a first look at a list of possibilities, to hear from the council what it wanted to see advanced. There were about 26 possible activities.

“We might get a slice of all of them. We are more likely to get one or two or even three of them,” she said.

“It will be quite important to figure out what is most encouraging of economic development.”

The matrix they were looking at was around what would bring in the most jobs.

Rather than say they would not have development contributions any more, the council might opt for a sliding scale.

Brian Wilson said the reality was that other regions used incentives and while he did not like them, Gisborne had to compete — but should do it cautiously.

Several speakers said the council had to be aware there were a lot of businesses that just got by and it was essential not to disadvantage them by giving advantages and incentives to new businesses.

The view was expressed that incentives should only go to someone who would not be competing with existing businesses. The council should be encouraging local businesses.

There was concern that the final decisions on where funding was directed might be made in Wellington.

Roger Haisman said there was nothing surer than that people in Wellington would plant the whole district in pine trees.

Mrs Campbell said it would be hard to say no to any money.

Some speakers were opposed to giving rate remissions to a select few and there was support for sliding scale of incentives.

Mayor Meng Foon said the whole $90 million in the council’s budget was really intended to create economic activity and advance the district.

The committee adopted a recommendation to instruct the chief executive to programme a review of council activity with the aim of reducing the costs of doing business in Tairawhiti without compromising community values.

THERE is limited time available for Gisborne District Council to come up with ideas for reducing the cost of doing business here and attract government funding for a regional action plan.

The Future Tairawhiti committee considered a number of possibilities for developing economic activity, ranging from a wood processing plant to rates remissions and incentives for new industries to come to the district.

It was reminded in a report from principal adviser Yvette Kinsella that the Government had identified Tairawhiti as one of five regions in a regional growth programme that would support the development and delivery of a plan to improve local economic performance.

What made this programme different from others was that there were eight Cabinet Ministers meeting each month to look at progress on the ground, she said.

District Council chief executive Judy Campbell said the Government wanted an action plan out fairly quickly to go before Cabinet.

The council probably had about a month to respond.

The eventual plan would be prepared with the involvement of central government, the council, iwi, Activate Tairawhiti and business interests.

Potential activities for advancement

This was a first look at a list of possibilities, to hear from the council what it wanted to see advanced. There were about 26 possible activities.

“We might get a slice of all of them. We are more likely to get one or two or even three of them,” she said.

“It will be quite important to figure out what is most encouraging of economic development.”

The matrix they were looking at was around what would bring in the most jobs.

Rather than say they would not have development contributions any more, the council might opt for a sliding scale.

Brian Wilson said the reality was that other regions used incentives and while he did not like them, Gisborne had to compete — but should do it cautiously.

Several speakers said the council had to be aware there were a lot of businesses that just got by and it was essential not to disadvantage them by giving advantages and incentives to new businesses.

The view was expressed that incentives should only go to someone who would not be competing with existing businesses. The council should be encouraging local businesses.

There was concern that the final decisions on where funding was directed might be made in Wellington.

Roger Haisman said there was nothing surer than that people in Wellington would plant the whole district in pine trees.

Mrs Campbell said it would be hard to say no to any money.

Some speakers were opposed to giving rate remissions to a select few and there was support for sliding scale of incentives.

Mayor Meng Foon said the whole $90 million in the council’s budget was really intended to create economic activity and advance the district.

The committee adopted a recommendation to instruct the chief executive to programme a review of council activity with the aim of reducing the costs of doing business in Tairawhiti without compromising community values.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the new identity and wellbeing focus of Trust Tairawhiti (formerly Eastland Community Trust)?