Business community part of economic plan

New economic development plan is business friendly.

New economic development plan is business friendly.

Picture by Liam Clayton

GISBORNE District Council had gone to great lengths to make sure the economic development plan the government asked for was business friendly, said chief executive Judy Campbell. She added it was not the council’s plan.

Final decisions on the plan would be made by the economic development agency Activate Tairawhiti, she said.

Ms Campbell was replying to a question from Andy Cranston who said the Minister Steven Joyce had made it clear he wanted the economic development plan to be a business plan and not council-led. How could the council achieve that?

Ms Campbell said she thought Mr Joyce was just making the point while here that it was not a council plan.

She had replied to an editorial on that topic in The Gisborne Herald saying that was why the council had looked at the issue of how it became business friendly as opposed to what they wanted to put in the plan.

Cedenco and LeaderBrand were on the governance group and the council had made concerted efforts to take the draft of the plan out to consultation with the business community.

“It has been to the winegrowers, it has been to Federated Farmers, we have got a big list of what business wanted in the plan,” she said.

There had to be someone who ultimately held the pen and made the choices.

Activate Tairawhiti own the plan

Individual businesses were focused on what they needed and somebody had to figure out how to refine that down between the 40 different projects. That would be Activate Tairawhiti as the owners of the plan.

“We have provided resources because Activate Tairawhiti does not have policy planners,” she said.

If it came down to a dispute it would be Activate Tairawhiti who made the decision.

“The minister has made some comments about it being slow but I have to say that is actually us resisting being pushed by the Ministry for Industry, Business and Enterprise to do the kinds of project they think we should do, versus the projects that the community wants to do.”

In answer to questions in Letters to the Editor asking when the public was going to see the plan, she said that would be up to Activate Tairawhiti but she understood there would be a stage where it was made public.

“But I can say hand on heart that the business community is fully part of this process.

Mayor Meng Foon said the council was definitely part of the economic development plan because if it got the money it would be providing the roads. There was no other organisation to do that.

Pat Seymour said it needed to be made clear that it was not the council’s economic development plan, it was the district’s, and the council might have an input later.

Mrs Campbell said they did not own the plan, it would not come out with GDC logos on it.

GISBORNE District Council had gone to great lengths to make sure the economic development plan the government asked for was business friendly, said chief executive Judy Campbell. She added it was not the council’s plan.

Final decisions on the plan would be made by the economic development agency Activate Tairawhiti, she said.

Ms Campbell was replying to a question from Andy Cranston who said the Minister Steven Joyce had made it clear he wanted the economic development plan to be a business plan and not council-led. How could the council achieve that?

Ms Campbell said she thought Mr Joyce was just making the point while here that it was not a council plan.

She had replied to an editorial on that topic in The Gisborne Herald saying that was why the council had looked at the issue of how it became business friendly as opposed to what they wanted to put in the plan.

Cedenco and LeaderBrand were on the governance group and the council had made concerted efforts to take the draft of the plan out to consultation with the business community.

“It has been to the winegrowers, it has been to Federated Farmers, we have got a big list of what business wanted in the plan,” she said.

There had to be someone who ultimately held the pen and made the choices.

Activate Tairawhiti own the plan

Individual businesses were focused on what they needed and somebody had to figure out how to refine that down between the 40 different projects. That would be Activate Tairawhiti as the owners of the plan.

“We have provided resources because Activate Tairawhiti does not have policy planners,” she said.

If it came down to a dispute it would be Activate Tairawhiti who made the decision.

“The minister has made some comments about it being slow but I have to say that is actually us resisting being pushed by the Ministry for Industry, Business and Enterprise to do the kinds of project they think we should do, versus the projects that the community wants to do.”

In answer to questions in Letters to the Editor asking when the public was going to see the plan, she said that would be up to Activate Tairawhiti but she understood there would be a stage where it was made public.

“But I can say hand on heart that the business community is fully part of this process.

Mayor Meng Foon said the council was definitely part of the economic development plan because if it got the money it would be providing the roads. There was no other organisation to do that.

Pat Seymour said it needed to be made clear that it was not the council’s economic development plan, it was the district’s, and the council might have an input later.

Mrs Campbell said they did not own the plan, it would not come out with GDC logos on it.

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Rus Holland - 3 years ago
And what of a Regional Digital Strategy....? It's been a long time since GigaTown....

Peter Jones - 3 years ago
According to the council, a council our size is allowed a bank credit line of about $80M. The guts of this regional plan is the same as the other NZ regional plans. Ask big brother how much he will lend you and then make up a plan of how you are going to spend the money. What they spend it on is of no particular significance because all they want is to get the region servicing an impossible debt to the banks. I wonder why? Heh Heh.

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