Gisborne man wins Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year

Roland Brown finds how to make magic at business school.

Roland Brown finds how to make magic at business school.

HIGH ACHIEVER: Friends and fellow students surround former Gisborne Boys’ High School student and dux of 2014, Roland Brown, after he was announced 2016 Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year awards. Picture supplied

AS one of three finalists in the 2016 Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year awards, Gisborne man Roland Brown was rapt to be announced as the winner.

“I was stoked and surprised. I didn’t think I had that great a chance when I heard the other two finalists’ heartfelt speeches.”

The University of Auckland Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year award is presented to the business school student who displays academic excellence, community service, communication skills, extra-curricular activities and knowledge of world issues.

The former Gisborne Boys’ High School student is in his second year at Auckland University where he is studying towards a conjoint degree in science and commerce.

For his Bachelor of Science degree he is majoring in chemistry while accounting and commercial law make up his major in the Bachelor of Commerce degree.

No stranger to high achievement, Mr Brown was Gisborne Boys’ High dux in 2014. Along with hard work, Mr Brown says at school he had good support from his teachers, especially from Maria Jefferson.

“They helped me get on the path,” he says.

Eligibility

Full-time students with Maori or Pacific Island heritage who are enrolled in a Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Business and Information Management or a Bachelor of Property at Auckland University are eligible for the award.

Mr Brown believes 10 nominees had applied for the award. He was one of three finalists who were given the same topic to speak on. This was “Westpac prides itself on creating magic for its customers. How do you create magic at the business school?”

Mr Brown talked about his involvement with tuakana, a learning community for Maori and Pacific students in which the tutors are other Maori and Pacific students.

“Tuakana aims to create an environment where students feel safe to interact and ask questions. Some students can find talking to lecturers and tutors a bit daunting.”

Mr Brown is also involved with Auckland University’s Maori Student Association. He has been involved in activities from study wananga, promoting varsity to tertiary students and Maori graduation.

At university he represents his whanau and iwi and does his best to make them proud, he says.

“They supported me to get to university, especially my mum and dad, Tama and Lyn.”

He also had a lot of support from Maori Student Academic Adviser Samuel Hughes.

He and his two brothers get their hard work ethic from their father, Tama Brown, says the Westpac Maori business student of the year.

Mr Brown celebrated his award with supporters from the Maori Student Association.

“They did a haka tautoko. I stood there feeling all these emotions.”

AS one of three finalists in the 2016 Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year awards, Gisborne man Roland Brown was rapt to be announced as the winner.

“I was stoked and surprised. I didn’t think I had that great a chance when I heard the other two finalists’ heartfelt speeches.”

The University of Auckland Westpac Maori Business Student of the Year award is presented to the business school student who displays academic excellence, community service, communication skills, extra-curricular activities and knowledge of world issues.

The former Gisborne Boys’ High School student is in his second year at Auckland University where he is studying towards a conjoint degree in science and commerce.

For his Bachelor of Science degree he is majoring in chemistry while accounting and commercial law make up his major in the Bachelor of Commerce degree.

No stranger to high achievement, Mr Brown was Gisborne Boys’ High dux in 2014. Along with hard work, Mr Brown says at school he had good support from his teachers, especially from Maria Jefferson.

“They helped me get on the path,” he says.

Eligibility

Full-time students with Maori or Pacific Island heritage who are enrolled in a Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Business and Information Management or a Bachelor of Property at Auckland University are eligible for the award.

Mr Brown believes 10 nominees had applied for the award. He was one of three finalists who were given the same topic to speak on. This was “Westpac prides itself on creating magic for its customers. How do you create magic at the business school?”

Mr Brown talked about his involvement with tuakana, a learning community for Maori and Pacific students in which the tutors are other Maori and Pacific students.

“Tuakana aims to create an environment where students feel safe to interact and ask questions. Some students can find talking to lecturers and tutors a bit daunting.”

Mr Brown is also involved with Auckland University’s Maori Student Association. He has been involved in activities from study wananga, promoting varsity to tertiary students and Maori graduation.

At university he represents his whanau and iwi and does his best to make them proud, he says.

“They supported me to get to university, especially my mum and dad, Tama and Lyn.”

He also had a lot of support from Maori Student Academic Adviser Samuel Hughes.

He and his two brothers get their hard work ethic from their father, Tama Brown, says the Westpac Maori business student of the year.

Mr Brown celebrated his award with supporters from the Maori Student Association.

“They did a haka tautoko. I stood there feeling all these emotions.”

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