Expo to showcase social enterprises

Akina Foundation's Thrive Tairawhiti social enterprise programme's local entrepreneurs will pitch ideas.

Akina Foundation's Thrive Tairawhiti social enterprise programme's local entrepreneurs will pitch ideas.

SOME of the region’s most conscientious entrepreneurs will pitch business ideas tomorrow, intended to make Gisborne a better place to live, and hope for potential backers to make them a reality.

As part of the Thrive Tairawhiti social enterprise programme created by the Akina Foundation, 14 local entrepreneurs have spent the past four months taking part in a programme designed to help individuals start and develop social enterprises.

Social enterprises are organisations effecting positive social and environmental change through trade.

Akina venture manager Emily Preston says the participants will be able to showcase their ventures at the Thrive Tairawhiti Expo at the Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club from 4pm tomorrow.

“The Thrive Tairawhiti Expo is about celebrating the participants’ progress over the course of the programme, as well as helping them to access vital support to take the next steps in their social enterprise journey.

“The event has been designed with the goals of the participants in mind.

“The needs of their communities are at the heart of their work and they are keen to share their ideas and to connect with potential supporters.”

The Thrive Tairawhiti programme, launched in July, was created to bring together entrepreneurs interested in starting for-purpose, social enterprise businesses and wanting to improve social or environmental outcomes in the community.

Over the past four months, the entrepreneurs have attended three two-day workshops that provided them with the tools and community support needed to take charge of their own learning through action and reflection.

Participant Josie McClutchie said the programme had helped her gain clarity around her idea for Tairawhiti Entrepreneurs (TE), a social media platform created to promote Maori owner/operated businesses in Tairawhiti.

“The four-week programme gave me the tools I needed to create critical community relationships and develop the TE concept so I can make a bigger impact in the community.”

SOME of the region’s most conscientious entrepreneurs will pitch business ideas tomorrow, intended to make Gisborne a better place to live, and hope for potential backers to make them a reality.

As part of the Thrive Tairawhiti social enterprise programme created by the Akina Foundation, 14 local entrepreneurs have spent the past four months taking part in a programme designed to help individuals start and develop social enterprises.

Social enterprises are organisations effecting positive social and environmental change through trade.

Akina venture manager Emily Preston says the participants will be able to showcase their ventures at the Thrive Tairawhiti Expo at the Waikanae Surf Life Saving Club from 4pm tomorrow.

“The Thrive Tairawhiti Expo is about celebrating the participants’ progress over the course of the programme, as well as helping them to access vital support to take the next steps in their social enterprise journey.

“The event has been designed with the goals of the participants in mind.

“The needs of their communities are at the heart of their work and they are keen to share their ideas and to connect with potential supporters.”

The Thrive Tairawhiti programme, launched in July, was created to bring together entrepreneurs interested in starting for-purpose, social enterprise businesses and wanting to improve social or environmental outcomes in the community.

Over the past four months, the entrepreneurs have attended three two-day workshops that provided them with the tools and community support needed to take charge of their own learning through action and reflection.

Participant Josie McClutchie said the programme had helped her gain clarity around her idea for Tairawhiti Entrepreneurs (TE), a social media platform created to promote Maori owner/operated businesses in Tairawhiti.

“The four-week programme gave me the tools I needed to create critical community relationships and develop the TE concept so I can make a bigger impact in the community.”

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the council's decision to defer plans for a wetland, as part of city wastewater treatment?