New economic relationship with Kaifeng Council, China

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon says visit a great success.

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon says visit a great success.

M.O.U. WITH KAIFENG: A memorandum of understanding for investment, trade and technology co-operation has been signed to encourage better economic relations between Gisborne District Council and Kaifeng Council, in China. From left are Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon, Derek Lardelli, Zhao Shufen, Jim Osler and Stephen Yu. Picture supplied

A FORMAL economic relationship has been set up between Gisborne District Council and Kaifeng Council in China.

A delegation from Kaifeng, a city of 5.8 million people in Henan province, has been visiting the district and signed a memorandum of understanding for investment, trade and technology co-operation.

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon said the visit was a great success.

“Between the two cities we aim to provide our community and businesses with opportunities to do trade.”

The Kaifeng delegation was welcomed at Toihoukura with students from Te Kura Kaupapa o Nga Uri a Maui, and the experience was “sincere and memorable”, they said.

Led by Zhao Shufen, director of the Kaifeng municipal foreign and overseas affairs office, and business people, they hope to facilitate a visit by a kapa haka team to showcase Tairawhiti culture to the people of Kaifeng.

They were impressed with our natural culture, Mr Foon said.

They enjoyed pizza at Wrights Vineyard and Winery, with some wine tasting. They also visited Stewart Poulson who manages a number of Gisborne citrus blocks.

“They were impressed with the freshness and sweetness of the oranges.”

Mr Foon said colleagues from Kaifeng who live in Auckland were keen to invest and complete the supply chain for export oranges to Kaifeng. This would mean better returns to growers.

He took the visitors to two of the district’s maunga, Gray’s Hill and Titirangi/Kaiti Hill.

“They love the clear sky, the blue sky and oceans, and our clean air. They are also keen on natural tourism, like hunting, fishing, diving and walking experiences.”

The city’s brand as the first city to see the sun had great appeal, he said.

“This one aspect is good Feng Shui, with the surrounding mountains with it, and beautiful ocean. A match made in heaven, said one.”

The council was keen to continue to liaise with the Kaifeng delegation.

“We want to know if anyone wishes to partner with them for an orange-growing venture.They expressed interest in investing on Maori land to grow orange groves.”

Mr Foon said anyone interested should call him.

A FORMAL economic relationship has been set up between Gisborne District Council and Kaifeng Council in China.

A delegation from Kaifeng, a city of 5.8 million people in Henan province, has been visiting the district and signed a memorandum of understanding for investment, trade and technology co-operation.

Gisborne Mayor Meng Foon said the visit was a great success.

“Between the two cities we aim to provide our community and businesses with opportunities to do trade.”

The Kaifeng delegation was welcomed at Toihoukura with students from Te Kura Kaupapa o Nga Uri a Maui, and the experience was “sincere and memorable”, they said.

Led by Zhao Shufen, director of the Kaifeng municipal foreign and overseas affairs office, and business people, they hope to facilitate a visit by a kapa haka team to showcase Tairawhiti culture to the people of Kaifeng.

They were impressed with our natural culture, Mr Foon said.

They enjoyed pizza at Wrights Vineyard and Winery, with some wine tasting. They also visited Stewart Poulson who manages a number of Gisborne citrus blocks.

“They were impressed with the freshness and sweetness of the oranges.”

Mr Foon said colleagues from Kaifeng who live in Auckland were keen to invest and complete the supply chain for export oranges to Kaifeng. This would mean better returns to growers.

He took the visitors to two of the district’s maunga, Gray’s Hill and Titirangi/Kaiti Hill.

“They love the clear sky, the blue sky and oceans, and our clean air. They are also keen on natural tourism, like hunting, fishing, diving and walking experiences.”

The city’s brand as the first city to see the sun had great appeal, he said.

“This one aspect is good Feng Shui, with the surrounding mountains with it, and beautiful ocean. A match made in heaven, said one.”

The council was keen to continue to liaise with the Kaifeng delegation.

“We want to know if anyone wishes to partner with them for an orange-growing venture.They expressed interest in investing on Maori land to grow orange groves.”

Mr Foon said anyone interested should call him.

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