Gisborne's economy grows

Bur region among lowest per capita.

Bur region among lowest per capita.

THE latest regional growth statistics show Gisborne continues to grow, but at a lower rate than the national average.

Gisborne’s GDP increased by 2.6 percent last year with increases in the fishing, forestry, and mining industries offset by a fall in agriculture.

Regional growth statistics, released by Statistics New Zealand (SNZ), show the district’s GDP was $1.8 billion, or $36,966 per capita.

Gisborne recorded the second lowest GDP per capita (out of 15 districts) with only Northland below at $36,531.
That compared to a national GDP per capita of $54,178.

Twelve out of New Zealand’s 15 regions grew in the year to March 2016.

Strongest growth

The strongest growth in the year was recorded in Bay of Plenty (7.7 percent), Auckland (6.0 percent), and Otago (4.8 percent) while Waikato, Wellington, Canterbury and Manawatu-Whanganui grew by more than 3 percent, just ahead of Gisborne.

Across New Zealand the average growth for the year was 4.1 percent.

The three regions to decline were most affected by the dairy downturn and the drop off in New Zealand’s mining and oil and gas industries: Taranaki, West Coast and Southland.

However, Taranaki retains the highest GDP per capita ($71,297) followed by Wellington ($67.888) and Auckland ($58,717.

Development Minister Simon Bridges said the figures were encouraging.

“Bay of Plenty is the highest growing region, underpinned by strong performances across a number of sectors including agriculture industries, primarily kiwifruit.

“The Government will continue to work intensively with regions through the Business Growth Agenda and the Regional Growth Programme.

“We are working actively with Southland, Taranaki and the West Coast in particular to help lift their growth rates in the years ahead.

“We are committed to helping every region in New Zealand achieve its potential by both attracting new investors and investing in the infrastructure for growth, be it ultrafast broadband to 150 more regional towns or key regional roading projects up and down the country.”

THE latest regional growth statistics show Gisborne continues to grow, but at a lower rate than the national average.

Gisborne’s GDP increased by 2.6 percent last year with increases in the fishing, forestry, and mining industries offset by a fall in agriculture.

Regional growth statistics, released by Statistics New Zealand (SNZ), show the district’s GDP was $1.8 billion, or $36,966 per capita.

Gisborne recorded the second lowest GDP per capita (out of 15 districts) with only Northland below at $36,531.
That compared to a national GDP per capita of $54,178.

Twelve out of New Zealand’s 15 regions grew in the year to March 2016.

Strongest growth

The strongest growth in the year was recorded in Bay of Plenty (7.7 percent), Auckland (6.0 percent), and Otago (4.8 percent) while Waikato, Wellington, Canterbury and Manawatu-Whanganui grew by more than 3 percent, just ahead of Gisborne.

Across New Zealand the average growth for the year was 4.1 percent.

The three regions to decline were most affected by the dairy downturn and the drop off in New Zealand’s mining and oil and gas industries: Taranaki, West Coast and Southland.

However, Taranaki retains the highest GDP per capita ($71,297) followed by Wellington ($67.888) and Auckland ($58,717.

Development Minister Simon Bridges said the figures were encouraging.

“Bay of Plenty is the highest growing region, underpinned by strong performances across a number of sectors including agriculture industries, primarily kiwifruit.

“The Government will continue to work intensively with regions through the Business Growth Agenda and the Regional Growth Programme.

“We are working actively with Southland, Taranaki and the West Coast in particular to help lift their growth rates in the years ahead.

“We are committed to helping every region in New Zealand achieve its potential by both attracting new investors and investing in the infrastructure for growth, be it ultrafast broadband to 150 more regional towns or key regional roading projects up and down the country.”

  • From 2011 to 2016, Gisborne’s GDP increased 14.8 percent, below the national movement of 23.8 percent.
    During this period, Gisborne’s contribution to GDP dropped 0.1 percentage points.
    SNZ said the 2011 to 2016 increase was “broad-based”, led by rental, hiring, and real estate services; manufacturing; and transport, postal and warehousing.
  • In 2014, Gisborne’s GDP increased 3.3 percent, due to primary production, most notably from agriculture, and forestry and logging.
  • In 2015 Gisborne’s economy increased 4.6 percent, mainly due to primary manufacturing.
  • In 2016 Gisborne’s GDP increased 2.6 percent with increases in fishing, forestry, and mining offset by a fall in agriculture.
Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern pushing Australia on sending 150 refugees from Manus Island to New Zealand?