April figures show spending increase in Gisborne

Almost $3 million more than usual spent on credit and debit cards.

Almost $3 million more than usual spent on credit and debit cards.

NZ Herald picture

EASTER trading was not allowed in Gisborne this year but consumers last month still spent almost $3 million more than usual on credit and debit cards.

Figures released yesterday by Paymark, which processes more than 75 percent of all electronic transactions, shows consumers here spent more than $40m in April, a 6.8 percent rise from the same month last year.

That came on the back of a 5.9 percent rise in the number of transactions made in the period.

Although other centres that allowed Easter trading experienced bigger increases, Gisborne still experienced one of the 10 biggest regional spending increases.

A Paymark spokesman said national underlying spending growth accelerated among merchants retailing food and liquor (eg supermarkets) and providing accommodation services (eg motels), rising to 9.7 percent and 27.2 percent respectively.

“Spending declined over Easter among merchants selling non-retail goods and services. Spending still increased over Easter among the food and beverage service merchants and among the traditional core retail shop, but the rate of growth was below the recent trend.

“The daily spending pattern also differed across the Easter period.

“The faster growth rate among food and beverage goods merchants primarily resulted from the extra spending on the Wednesday and Thursday before Easter, despite the wet weather, plus Easter Saturday. This more than offset the lower spending on Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

“Spending through non-food core retailers showed a similar pattern, albeit with a much reduced pre-Easter spending boost. National spending through the cafes and bars did pick up on the Monday.”

Hawke’s Bay, including Wairoa where Easter trading was allowed, experienced the nation’s biggest spending increase, up 11.7 percent on the same time last year.

EASTER trading was not allowed in Gisborne this year but consumers last month still spent almost $3 million more than usual on credit and debit cards.

Figures released yesterday by Paymark, which processes more than 75 percent of all electronic transactions, shows consumers here spent more than $40m in April, a 6.8 percent rise from the same month last year.

That came on the back of a 5.9 percent rise in the number of transactions made in the period.

Although other centres that allowed Easter trading experienced bigger increases, Gisborne still experienced one of the 10 biggest regional spending increases.

A Paymark spokesman said national underlying spending growth accelerated among merchants retailing food and liquor (eg supermarkets) and providing accommodation services (eg motels), rising to 9.7 percent and 27.2 percent respectively.

“Spending declined over Easter among merchants selling non-retail goods and services. Spending still increased over Easter among the food and beverage service merchants and among the traditional core retail shop, but the rate of growth was below the recent trend.

“The daily spending pattern also differed across the Easter period.

“The faster growth rate among food and beverage goods merchants primarily resulted from the extra spending on the Wednesday and Thursday before Easter, despite the wet weather, plus Easter Saturday. This more than offset the lower spending on Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

“Spending through non-food core retailers showed a similar pattern, albeit with a much reduced pre-Easter spending boost. National spending through the cafes and bars did pick up on the Monday.”

Hawke’s Bay, including Wairoa where Easter trading was allowed, experienced the nation’s biggest spending increase, up 11.7 percent on the same time last year.

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