Opening in business course

‘The first step is to recognise that change is hard’

‘The first step is to recognise that change is hard’

LEAN MANUFACTURING: Toyota was one of the first companies to take up te principles. File picture

GISBORNE businesses need to get in quick to register for the sole remaining place at a workshop aimed at instilling the Lean manufacturing principles pioneered by the likes of Toyota and Google. Some former participants are now boosting staffing levels to keep up with increased productivity.

Even if businesses are faced with rising costs and falling efficiencies and profits, those falls are “all reversible” through changing failing practices to encompass Lean manufacturing principles, said Lean Hub spokesman Trevor Hall.

“However, the first step is to recognise that change is hard. You need to have the patience and provide the resources to support change.”

Mr Hall said for some people that first step would be to participate in the Better by Lean course, which comes to Gisborne for the second year on Thursday.

He emphasises that the course, facilitated by Activate Tairawhiti and the University Of Auckland, and funded by Crown-company Callaghan Innovation, should be seen as a way for businesses to take the first step in their Lean journey.

“Lean shouldn’t be looked upon as a short-term diet for business but more as a long-term sustainable health programme.”

The Lean Hub has a strong presence in the Gisborne region to help keep businesses on track well into the future.

“In years gone by, businesses — Toyota being one of many — have invested significantly over many decades to develop improvement systems for business, but in today’s fast-moving global market, businesses cannot afford to spend that long improving, so they need a proven, robust and effective system to improve.

“Gisborne businesses that have chosen to adopt Lean philosophy following on from the previous Better By Lean course of 2016 are experiencing improvements in productivity and lead times, some by as much as 30 percent.

"Responsibilities shifted from senior management to supervisors and front-line staff enable management to focus on driving the business forward while the supervisors focus on ‘getting the job done’.”

Gisborne exporter PetfoodNZ International has already improved the quality and consistency of products leaving its factory since joining the programme.

“We have a mission and have set our core values as a team for the business, it is no longer just management telling staff what to do and how to do it”, said managing director Phil Moulds.

“All staff now have a say in how things are done. We agree as a group, then document what we have agreed and train accordingly. People take ownership of what they have agreed to and hold themselves and others accountable if the standards are not met.

“We still have a long way to go with our Lean journey, but if we are to be here and be successful in five to 10 years and onwards, then we need to be the best at what we do and Lean Manufacturing is definitely the way to ensure this outcome. Constant improvement and a focus on innovation by the entire team is the key.”

Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen said while the course had been fully booked for some time, one participant had pulled out of the forum.

“So there is one space available if someone is quick.”

Contact Steve@activatetairawhiti.co.nz to register interest in attending the course.

GISBORNE businesses need to get in quick to register for the sole remaining place at a workshop aimed at instilling the Lean manufacturing principles pioneered by the likes of Toyota and Google. Some former participants are now boosting staffing levels to keep up with increased productivity.

Even if businesses are faced with rising costs and falling efficiencies and profits, those falls are “all reversible” through changing failing practices to encompass Lean manufacturing principles, said Lean Hub spokesman Trevor Hall.

“However, the first step is to recognise that change is hard. You need to have the patience and provide the resources to support change.”

Mr Hall said for some people that first step would be to participate in the Better by Lean course, which comes to Gisborne for the second year on Thursday.

He emphasises that the course, facilitated by Activate Tairawhiti and the University Of Auckland, and funded by Crown-company Callaghan Innovation, should be seen as a way for businesses to take the first step in their Lean journey.

“Lean shouldn’t be looked upon as a short-term diet for business but more as a long-term sustainable health programme.”

The Lean Hub has a strong presence in the Gisborne region to help keep businesses on track well into the future.

“In years gone by, businesses — Toyota being one of many — have invested significantly over many decades to develop improvement systems for business, but in today’s fast-moving global market, businesses cannot afford to spend that long improving, so they need a proven, robust and effective system to improve.

“Gisborne businesses that have chosen to adopt Lean philosophy following on from the previous Better By Lean course of 2016 are experiencing improvements in productivity and lead times, some by as much as 30 percent.

"Responsibilities shifted from senior management to supervisors and front-line staff enable management to focus on driving the business forward while the supervisors focus on ‘getting the job done’.”

Gisborne exporter PetfoodNZ International has already improved the quality and consistency of products leaving its factory since joining the programme.

“We have a mission and have set our core values as a team for the business, it is no longer just management telling staff what to do and how to do it”, said managing director Phil Moulds.

“All staff now have a say in how things are done. We agree as a group, then document what we have agreed and train accordingly. People take ownership of what they have agreed to and hold themselves and others accountable if the standards are not met.

“We still have a long way to go with our Lean journey, but if we are to be here and be successful in five to 10 years and onwards, then we need to be the best at what we do and Lean Manufacturing is definitely the way to ensure this outcome. Constant improvement and a focus on innovation by the entire team is the key.”

Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen said while the course had been fully booked for some time, one participant had pulled out of the forum.

“So there is one space available if someone is quick.”

Contact Steve@activatetairawhiti.co.nz to register interest in attending the course.

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