Recruiting well vital

This is a story to educate employers on best-practice recruitment in the workplace.

My name is Dave and I had a dog called Personal Grievance, PG for short. Earlier in May, PG left us. It was a stressful time for me and the other dogs in my company.

We had a great relationship until I had to have some difficult conversations with him about his behaviour towards other dogs. I gave him a couple of warnings and let him know what the consequences would be, and hoped that would be the end of it. Unfortunately, his behaviour didn’t improve but as it happens, PG left and found another owner anyway.

Since we parted on bad terms, I was worried that PG might lodge a complaint with the Pet Ownership Authority. He had 90 days to do this but I haven’t heard anything. Whew! I did call BDO Gisborne’s People & Performance Consultancy team and they assured me that I hadn’t broken any employment rules this time, but there were some key factors missing if I wanted to operate under best practice.

After PG left me for a new owner, I figured I’d better start looking for a replacement. I asked around my networks and had a few referrals. I also placed a couple of ads on the internet and in the local newspaper to cover all bases. Last time, I hired based on a friendly referral, so I skipped the interview and reference checking process. Maybe that’s why it didn’t work out with PG.

We had many applicants. I responded to each application that I received from dogs wanting me to be their new owner. It was overwhelming to be honest. I was careful to select dogs that matched my criteria and when I interviewed them, I made sure I understood why they wanted to move on from their current owner to live with me.

I couldn’t help but think that PG had most likely applied to a new owner before the trouble began. But dogs move on, and owners move on too. It’s not the end of the world and I was enthusiastic about finding a new dog. I took some for walks, as part of their interview, to see how they interacted with other dogs — and made my selection based on that.

I selected a lovely dog called Best Practice who received glowing references from its previous owners. I had followed a good recruitment process and Best Practice was the result.

What is best practice? An effective approach or process that is proven to lead to a desired result.

Key principles for a best-practice interview and selection process:

• Conduct candidate interviews

• Conduct comprehensive reference checks and, if appropriate, pre-employment screening on preferred candidates such as police vetting, credit history and behaviour profiling

• Be systematic and impartial throughout the process to assess each candidate equally

• Avoid hiring under pressure.

For more guidance on HR best practice, contact our experienced People & Performance team at BDO Gisborne. By contacting BDO before the first red flag, our team will help you minimise employment concerns in the future.

Linda Paulson loves being an HR adviser and a member of the BDO Gisborne team. She thrives on getting to know business owners and their business; to understand their issues and help them achieve best outcomes in the employment and employee space.

This is a story to educate employers on best-practice recruitment in the workplace.

My name is Dave and I had a dog called Personal Grievance, PG for short. Earlier in May, PG left us. It was a stressful time for me and the other dogs in my company.

We had a great relationship until I had to have some difficult conversations with him about his behaviour towards other dogs. I gave him a couple of warnings and let him know what the consequences would be, and hoped that would be the end of it. Unfortunately, his behaviour didn’t improve but as it happens, PG left and found another owner anyway.

Since we parted on bad terms, I was worried that PG might lodge a complaint with the Pet Ownership Authority. He had 90 days to do this but I haven’t heard anything. Whew! I did call BDO Gisborne’s People & Performance Consultancy team and they assured me that I hadn’t broken any employment rules this time, but there were some key factors missing if I wanted to operate under best practice.

After PG left me for a new owner, I figured I’d better start looking for a replacement. I asked around my networks and had a few referrals. I also placed a couple of ads on the internet and in the local newspaper to cover all bases. Last time, I hired based on a friendly referral, so I skipped the interview and reference checking process. Maybe that’s why it didn’t work out with PG.

We had many applicants. I responded to each application that I received from dogs wanting me to be their new owner. It was overwhelming to be honest. I was careful to select dogs that matched my criteria and when I interviewed them, I made sure I understood why they wanted to move on from their current owner to live with me.

I couldn’t help but think that PG had most likely applied to a new owner before the trouble began. But dogs move on, and owners move on too. It’s not the end of the world and I was enthusiastic about finding a new dog. I took some for walks, as part of their interview, to see how they interacted with other dogs — and made my selection based on that.

I selected a lovely dog called Best Practice who received glowing references from its previous owners. I had followed a good recruitment process and Best Practice was the result.

What is best practice? An effective approach or process that is proven to lead to a desired result.

Key principles for a best-practice interview and selection process:

• Conduct candidate interviews

• Conduct comprehensive reference checks and, if appropriate, pre-employment screening on preferred candidates such as police vetting, credit history and behaviour profiling

• Be systematic and impartial throughout the process to assess each candidate equally

• Avoid hiring under pressure.

For more guidance on HR best practice, contact our experienced People & Performance team at BDO Gisborne. By contacting BDO before the first red flag, our team will help you minimise employment concerns in the future.

Linda Paulson loves being an HR adviser and a member of the BDO Gisborne team. She thrives on getting to know business owners and their business; to understand their issues and help them achieve best outcomes in the employment and employee space.

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winston moreton - 2 months ago
Leaving aside my initial gripe about a male employee (styled as a dog) being put up as a model by a woman HR adviser at BDO, let me say I agree with much of what she says. The solution though, now being adopted in every industry from banking (especially electronic banking) to forestry, is to employ robots (computers and machines) who do not attract payroll tax or raise relationship issues let alone health and safety. If robots are too dear for short-term projects then the answer is short-term-employees called, wait for it, independent contractors. Remember wharfies and linesmen? Replaced by contractor companies.

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