Record cruise ship visits booked for 2018-19

Callisto Ormsby-Cairns, four, with cruise ship the Marina behind. Every visit adds around $300,000 to the local economy. File picture

CRUISE ships visiting Gisborne last year added $3 million to the New Zealand economy and, with a record number of cruise liners waiting to visit, that contribution is expected to grow by another $10 million over the next two years.

Eighteen ships are lined up for the summer of 2018-19.

The latest report on cruise tourism’s economic contribution released at the annual New Zealand Cruise Association Conference in Auckland on Tuesday, showed the 11 cruise ship visits to Gisborne last year added $3m to gross domestic product (GDP).

Six ship visits are booked for this summer, with the report estimating that will add $2m.

The big payday is expected the following season. New Zealand Cruise Association expects the record 18 ship visits to add $6m to the economy.

Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen said knowing the scale of the planned visits provided valuable time to plan ahead.

“The cruise market is a key one for the region, as the 2018 season demonstrates.

“The intention is to work with the cruise ship operators to better understand the buying behaviours of passengers, and work with local operators to build on what is provided to offer higher-value experiences and opportunities that will appeal to the passengers.

“Knowing when the ships will be here means we have better certainty to base our efforts around. Targeting this market means we’re developing experiences that would also appeal to visitors who arrive in the region by other means and at other times of the season.”

New Zealand Cruise Association chief executive Kevin O’Sullivan said Gisborne could be excited about its future as an emerging port.

“It is something local people should be pleased with. However, on a cautionary note, these figures are somewhat volatile and could change.”

Mr O’Sullivan said Deane Craw from Eastland Port was on the panel for emerging ports, and was a very good advocate for the port and region.

The contribution the cruise industry made to New Zealand was projected to increase 43 percent in the next two years, from $447 million in 2016/17, to $640m in the 2018/19 season.

Mr O’Sullivan said the number of days cruise ships spent in New Zealand ports would increase 31 percent, from 747 last season to more than 980 in 2018/19.

Passengers enjoying New Zealand hospitality would increase 46 percent over the same period, from almost 236,000 to over 344,000, mainly from Australia, North America and Europe.

“The cruise sector supports around 8000 jobs, and this is projected to grow by 38 percent to more than 11,000 in 2018/19.”

CRUISE ships visiting Gisborne last year added $3 million to the New Zealand economy and, with a record number of cruise liners waiting to visit, that contribution is expected to grow by another $10 million over the next two years.

Eighteen ships are lined up for the summer of 2018-19.

The latest report on cruise tourism’s economic contribution released at the annual New Zealand Cruise Association Conference in Auckland on Tuesday, showed the 11 cruise ship visits to Gisborne last year added $3m to gross domestic product (GDP).

Six ship visits are booked for this summer, with the report estimating that will add $2m.

The big payday is expected the following season. New Zealand Cruise Association expects the record 18 ship visits to add $6m to the economy.

Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen said knowing the scale of the planned visits provided valuable time to plan ahead.

“The cruise market is a key one for the region, as the 2018 season demonstrates.

“The intention is to work with the cruise ship operators to better understand the buying behaviours of passengers, and work with local operators to build on what is provided to offer higher-value experiences and opportunities that will appeal to the passengers.

“Knowing when the ships will be here means we have better certainty to base our efforts around. Targeting this market means we’re developing experiences that would also appeal to visitors who arrive in the region by other means and at other times of the season.”

New Zealand Cruise Association chief executive Kevin O’Sullivan said Gisborne could be excited about its future as an emerging port.

“It is something local people should be pleased with. However, on a cautionary note, these figures are somewhat volatile and could change.”

Mr O’Sullivan said Deane Craw from Eastland Port was on the panel for emerging ports, and was a very good advocate for the port and region.

The contribution the cruise industry made to New Zealand was projected to increase 43 percent in the next two years, from $447 million in 2016/17, to $640m in the 2018/19 season.

Mr O’Sullivan said the number of days cruise ships spent in New Zealand ports would increase 31 percent, from 747 last season to more than 980 in 2018/19.

Passengers enjoying New Zealand hospitality would increase 46 percent over the same period, from almost 236,000 to over 344,000, mainly from Australia, North America and Europe.

“The cruise sector supports around 8000 jobs, and this is projected to grow by 38 percent to more than 11,000 in 2018/19.”

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