Govt grants of $1.28m for tourism projects

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TOURISM Minister Kelvin Davis has announced that the Government is investing $1.28 million to support Gisborne’s growing visitor industry.

Funding includes $1,269,300 to help Gisborne District Council with the construction of carparks and walkways in the inner harbour and on Titirangi maunga/Kaiti Kill, in preparation for Te Ha 250th commemorations of the arrival of James Cook and the first formal meetings between Maori and Europeans.

The investment is made through the first round of the Tourism Infrastructure Fund, with a second funding round expected in early 2018.

A further $10,072 will be awarded for the upkeep of the Motu Trails, part of Nga Haerenga, the New Zealand Cycle Trail.

Mayor Meng Foon said he was excited by the funding announcement.

“The fund will help us start the many projects we have on Titirangi, the inner harbour and the Motu Trails," he said.

“A lot of hard work has been put into this project and I thank all those who have participated — council, iwi, stakeholders and our community.

“I’m sure our community and the nation will be proud of the finished projects, as this is part of a long journey of stories told through infrastructure.

“Both our MPs, Kiri Allan (list MP) and Meka Whaitiri (Ikaroa-Rawhiti) have heard our stories, our community presentations, and we thank them for their support during the process.

“I have just had a briefing from our Tairawhiti Navigations team and there is a lot happening.

“It's so exciting to see great passion and willingness to co-operate to ensure the projects have integrity and are enduring for current and future generations.”

Ms Allan said the new funding was good news for the Gisborne region.

“Visitors to Gisborne spent $140 million in the year to October, an increase of 3 percent across the year.

“We want to keep these economic benefits flowing, and to ensure visitors and locals alike continue to enjoy Gisborne’s great spaces.

“Tourism offers real potential for creating sustainable jobs and economic growth in our region, but to do this we need to get the basics right.”

The Tourism Infrastructure Fund provides financial support for local tourism-related infrastructure where tourism growth (domestic and international) is placing pressure on, or potential growth is constrained by, existing infrastructure and the local community is unable to respond in a timely way without assistance.

Councils, or community organisations with council support, are eligible to apply for local visitor-related infrastructure.

The Motu Trails funding comes from the seventh round of the Maintaining the Quality of Great Rides Fund, which aims to ensure New Zealand’s premier rides are maintained to their world-class standard.

Nationwide over $14.2m has been allocated by the Government to various local councils for 30 visitor-related infrastructure projects and four feasibility studies.

TOURISM Minister Kelvin Davis has announced that the Government is investing $1.28 million to support Gisborne’s growing visitor industry.

Funding includes $1,269,300 to help Gisborne District Council with the construction of carparks and walkways in the inner harbour and on Titirangi maunga/Kaiti Kill, in preparation for Te Ha 250th commemorations of the arrival of James Cook and the first formal meetings between Maori and Europeans.

The investment is made through the first round of the Tourism Infrastructure Fund, with a second funding round expected in early 2018.

A further $10,072 will be awarded for the upkeep of the Motu Trails, part of Nga Haerenga, the New Zealand Cycle Trail.

Mayor Meng Foon said he was excited by the funding announcement.

“The fund will help us start the many projects we have on Titirangi, the inner harbour and the Motu Trails," he said.

“A lot of hard work has been put into this project and I thank all those who have participated — council, iwi, stakeholders and our community.

“I’m sure our community and the nation will be proud of the finished projects, as this is part of a long journey of stories told through infrastructure.

“Both our MPs, Kiri Allan (list MP) and Meka Whaitiri (Ikaroa-Rawhiti) have heard our stories, our community presentations, and we thank them for their support during the process.

“I have just had a briefing from our Tairawhiti Navigations team and there is a lot happening.

“It's so exciting to see great passion and willingness to co-operate to ensure the projects have integrity and are enduring for current and future generations.”

Ms Allan said the new funding was good news for the Gisborne region.

“Visitors to Gisborne spent $140 million in the year to October, an increase of 3 percent across the year.

“We want to keep these economic benefits flowing, and to ensure visitors and locals alike continue to enjoy Gisborne’s great spaces.

“Tourism offers real potential for creating sustainable jobs and economic growth in our region, but to do this we need to get the basics right.”

The Tourism Infrastructure Fund provides financial support for local tourism-related infrastructure where tourism growth (domestic and international) is placing pressure on, or potential growth is constrained by, existing infrastructure and the local community is unable to respond in a timely way without assistance.

Councils, or community organisations with council support, are eligible to apply for local visitor-related infrastructure.

The Motu Trails funding comes from the seventh round of the Maintaining the Quality of Great Rides Fund, which aims to ensure New Zealand’s premier rides are maintained to their world-class standard.

Nationwide over $14.2m has been allocated by the Government to various local councils for 30 visitor-related infrastructure projects and four feasibility studies.

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