Scribe’s return

It’s a common story but this one particularly special being told by one family.

It’s a common story but this one particularly special being told by one family.

FAMILY AFFAIR: Stephanie Richardson (marketing manager) and Drew James (senior producer) are looking forward to bringing The White Guitar, featuring Malo Luafutu (aka rapper Scribe), his brother Matthias and their father John, to Gisborne. Picture supplied

TEENAGE boys shedding tears at the theatre? It seems unlikely but it’s happening, and a familiar face is inciting the emotion.

Malo Luafutu (aka Kiwi rapper Scribe) stars alongside father John Luafutu and brother Matthias Luafutu in The White Guitar.

The hard-hitting play tells the story of the Luafutu family’s journey from a village in Samoa to migrant life in New Zealand.

“It really is an outstanding show — it’s quite a common story on some levels but it’s particularly special because it is told by one family,” says senior producer Drew James.

“It’s been a very long and torturous process for the people on stage.”

Violence, drug addiction, prison and gangs feature heavily in the drama which was co-written by the father-son trio but the producers say the message is uplifting.

“It’s a great insight into what that slice of New Zealand go through and it’s really great theatre,” says James.

“We have had 17-year-olds crying in the audience. Sometimes you watch a show and it really hits you in the guts; this show is one of those.”

The drama, which is being toured by Pacific theatre company The Conch, was selected by Performing Arts Network of New Zealand (PANNZ) for its emotive performances and cultural significance.

PANNZ is a performing arts agency that helps New Zealand theatre companies tour shows across the country. Each year the agency selects a number of theatre projects to work alongside.

With rave reviews following its opening at the 2015 Christchurch Arts Festival, The White Guitar was an easy choice for PAANZ.

One review written by music editor Vicki Anderson described the work as ground-breaking.

“As the Christchurch audience rose to offer the Luafutu men a standing ovation, I know I have just witnessed a seminal moment in New Zealand theatre history,” she wrote.

These comments will be no surprise to the producers, who report standing ovations at every show.

Some have attributed the show’s success to director Nina Nawalowalo’s eye for visual effects. No doubt her enthusiasm for the drama also helped.

“In directing and producing The White Guitar we were drawn to the raw truth of the Luafutu’s story,” she says.

“These are three extraordinary men who have the courage to tell a story of hope found under oppression, a journey from hurt to healing, but above all a belief that the truth will set us all free.”

With music featuring heavily in the show, Scribe fans will not be disappointed.

However, they might be pleasantly surprised to find the rapper is not the only Luafutu with a musical ear.

TEENAGE boys shedding tears at the theatre? It seems unlikely but it’s happening, and a familiar face is inciting the emotion.

Malo Luafutu (aka Kiwi rapper Scribe) stars alongside father John Luafutu and brother Matthias Luafutu in The White Guitar.

The hard-hitting play tells the story of the Luafutu family’s journey from a village in Samoa to migrant life in New Zealand.

“It really is an outstanding show — it’s quite a common story on some levels but it’s particularly special because it is told by one family,” says senior producer Drew James.

“It’s been a very long and torturous process for the people on stage.”

Violence, drug addiction, prison and gangs feature heavily in the drama which was co-written by the father-son trio but the producers say the message is uplifting.

“It’s a great insight into what that slice of New Zealand go through and it’s really great theatre,” says James.

“We have had 17-year-olds crying in the audience. Sometimes you watch a show and it really hits you in the guts; this show is one of those.”

The drama, which is being toured by Pacific theatre company The Conch, was selected by Performing Arts Network of New Zealand (PANNZ) for its emotive performances and cultural significance.

PANNZ is a performing arts agency that helps New Zealand theatre companies tour shows across the country. Each year the agency selects a number of theatre projects to work alongside.

With rave reviews following its opening at the 2015 Christchurch Arts Festival, The White Guitar was an easy choice for PAANZ.

One review written by music editor Vicki Anderson described the work as ground-breaking.

“As the Christchurch audience rose to offer the Luafutu men a standing ovation, I know I have just witnessed a seminal moment in New Zealand theatre history,” she wrote.

These comments will be no surprise to the producers, who report standing ovations at every show.

Some have attributed the show’s success to director Nina Nawalowalo’s eye for visual effects. No doubt her enthusiasm for the drama also helped.

“In directing and producing The White Guitar we were drawn to the raw truth of the Luafutu’s story,” she says.

“These are three extraordinary men who have the courage to tell a story of hope found under oppression, a journey from hurt to healing, but above all a belief that the truth will set us all free.”

With music featuring heavily in the show, Scribe fans will not be disappointed.

However, they might be pleasantly surprised to find the rapper is not the only Luafutu with a musical ear.

The White Guitar shows at the War Memorial Theatre; October 4 and 5 (8pm). Tickets can be purchased from Stephen Jones Photography or online at www.ticketdirect.co.nz

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