Cone head a nod to Banksy

Unusual addition to art work sparks speculation.

Unusual addition to art work sparks speculation.

The Drinker by British street artist Banksy.
Picture by Steve Lazarides.
LOCALLY: The Gisborne version of a Banksy work? Picture by Mark Peters

HAS notorious British street artist Banksy hit Gisborne?

Stencil work in the style of the talented vandal recently appeared in Tauranga, sparking speculation about a visit to the city by the anonymous artist.

The appearance this week in Gisborne of a traffic cone parked like a dunce’s cap on the head of the fibreglass figure in Peel Street sparked similar, but less widespread, speculation.

In 2004, the elusive street artist used the traffic cone motif in his bronze artwork based on late-19th century sculptor, Auguste Rodin’s famous piece, The Thinker.

Banksy illegally erected his three-metre tall statue in a central London square. Called The Drinker, the elusive street artist’s version of Rodin’s work looked a little worse for wear and had a traffic cone on its head.

Similarities with the Gisborne cone-head work are strong.

While Banksy’s sculpture was abducted by a group of masked thieves known as Art Kieda a few days after its installation, the Peel Street work has been spared a similar fate.

One wit, who also prefers to remain anonymous, says there is still time.

HAS notorious British street artist Banksy hit Gisborne?

Stencil work in the style of the talented vandal recently appeared in Tauranga, sparking speculation about a visit to the city by the anonymous artist.

The appearance this week in Gisborne of a traffic cone parked like a dunce’s cap on the head of the fibreglass figure in Peel Street sparked similar, but less widespread, speculation.

In 2004, the elusive street artist used the traffic cone motif in his bronze artwork based on late-19th century sculptor, Auguste Rodin’s famous piece, The Thinker.

Banksy illegally erected his three-metre tall statue in a central London square. Called The Drinker, the elusive street artist’s version of Rodin’s work looked a little worse for wear and had a traffic cone on its head.

Similarities with the Gisborne cone-head work are strong.

While Banksy’s sculpture was abducted by a group of masked thieves known as Art Kieda a few days after its installation, the Peel Street work has been spared a similar fate.

One wit, who also prefers to remain anonymous, says there is still time.

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