On show around the cafes

Local talent on display.

Local talent on display.

Tuamotu Island Sponge Bay by Troy Conole.
ABSTRACT ACRYLICS: Gene Paul Walker is influenced by Cy Twombly. Picture by Liam Clayton
DARKER: Richard Rogers' works have some hidden agendas. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell.
LIMITED EDITION: Nature inspires Gisborne artist Jo Foster. Picture supplied

Gene Paul Walker at Flagship

Studio detritus, charcoal marks and even the odd drop of red wine feature in Gene Paul Walker’s large acrylic on canvas abstract works.

Street and grunge art are deep in the background of Walker’s paintings.

“Even the raw piece of canvas is beautiful itself. It’s like an artwork even before painting.”

Along with New York street artist Jean Basquiat and neo-expressionist Julian Schnabel, Walker cites American artist Cy Twombly as an influence.

Twombly’s works are predominantly large-scale, freely-scribbled, graffiti-like works on solid fields of mostly gray, tan, or off-white colours.

“There’s a lot of life in mark-making,” says Walker.

“A lot of my painting I do on the ground. It took me a long time to come back to abstract art. It’s stripped back now.”

Troy Conole at Muirs Bookshop Cafe

Local beaches and surf breaks feature in a collection of digital illustrations on canvas by Troy Conole at Muirs Bookshop Cafe. The limited edition prints are based on photographic images but reworked by Conole to create a painterly composition.

Richard Rogers at Verve

Eclectic is the name of Gisborne artist and art teacher Richard Rogers’ show at Verve Cafe. Rogers’ paintings and sculptures have taken on a slightly darker turn.

“There are some hidden agendas in there,” he says.

A work that features a teddy bear on a rope refers to the issue of suicides in the farming community.

Jo Foster at Zest

Award-winning Gisborne artist Jo Foster takes her inspiration from nature and describes her work as “environmental realism”.

A series of limited edition prints of her work are on display at Zest Cafe.

Gene Paul Walker at Flagship

Studio detritus, charcoal marks and even the odd drop of red wine feature in Gene Paul Walker’s large acrylic on canvas abstract works.

Street and grunge art are deep in the background of Walker’s paintings.

“Even the raw piece of canvas is beautiful itself. It’s like an artwork even before painting.”

Along with New York street artist Jean Basquiat and neo-expressionist Julian Schnabel, Walker cites American artist Cy Twombly as an influence.

Twombly’s works are predominantly large-scale, freely-scribbled, graffiti-like works on solid fields of mostly gray, tan, or off-white colours.

“There’s a lot of life in mark-making,” says Walker.

“A lot of my painting I do on the ground. It took me a long time to come back to abstract art. It’s stripped back now.”

Troy Conole at Muirs Bookshop Cafe

Local beaches and surf breaks feature in a collection of digital illustrations on canvas by Troy Conole at Muirs Bookshop Cafe. The limited edition prints are based on photographic images but reworked by Conole to create a painterly composition.

Richard Rogers at Verve

Eclectic is the name of Gisborne artist and art teacher Richard Rogers’ show at Verve Cafe. Rogers’ paintings and sculptures have taken on a slightly darker turn.

“There are some hidden agendas in there,” he says.

A work that features a teddy bear on a rope refers to the issue of suicides in the farming community.

Jo Foster at Zest

Award-winning Gisborne artist Jo Foster takes her inspiration from nature and describes her work as “environmental realism”.

A series of limited edition prints of her work are on display at Zest Cafe.

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