Green light for Green Day tribute

Band has long dreamed of staging a Green Day tribute, and now it's happening.

Band has long dreamed of staging a Green Day tribute, and now it's happening.

THE SEARCH: Gisborne band The Search’s young rockers Kees Albers-Connolly (left), Ethan Hannah, Kyle Hannah and Ben Allan prepare for their Green Day tribute performance at the end of the month.
Picture by Jason Hailes

AS A pint-sized rocker, Kyle Hannah featured on American pop punk band Green Day’s website. Now a teenage drummer with The Search, Kyle and his band mates Ethan Hannah (lead singer/rhythm guitar), Kees Albers-Connolly (lead guitar) and Ben Allan (bass), look forward to their Green Day tribute gig at Smash Palace.

“We’ve all been fans of Green Day, especially Ethan and I, since we were four and five year olds and saw the American Idiot video,” says Kyle.

For the Green Day website picture, Kyle dressed up as singer-lead guitarist Billy Joe Armstrong and struck a rock star pose.

The band has long dreamed of staging a Green Day tribute. News the five-time Grammy award winning band is coming to New Zealand in May galvanised The Search’s decision to make their dream come true.

“This is perfect timing for the gig,” says Kees.

“We’ve always wanted to do this,” says Kyle. “I’ve always liked Green Day’s fast, upbeat tempo and memorable guitar riffs. As I grow up I like their political stance, especially in the new album, Revolution Radio.”

“There is something about the lead guitarist’s sound and style that is inspirational,” says Kees.

“There’s a simplicity but it’s his own sound.”

“For the tribute, we try to do exactly what they do,” says Ethan. “My voice suits Billy Joe’s. His range is like mine.”

“The way Ethan sings helped with our decision to do the tribute,” says Kyle. “We got in touch with Darryl Monteith at Smash Palace and he gave us the green light.”

Because the lads are underage they have to finish rocking the palace by 10pm. And they need to be accompanied by an adult.

“Our parents always come to our gigs to support us, anyway,” says Kyle.

The young musicians met while at Gisborne Intermediate and formed The Search in 2013. In the same year they performed in the regional Smokefree Rockquest.

Ben joined The Search in 2014. The band came third in the regional event that year, second in 2015 and took first place last year.

“We’ve got better every year,” says Kyle.

The band’s repertoire is mostly made up of covers but as the musicians mature they perform more and more originals penned by Kyle.

“Our older songs are not so serious and meaningful,” he says.

“But now he’s going to parties he’s getting more of a developed philosophy on life,” says Kees.

“When Green Day first started they were a hard core punk rock band like us,” says Kyle. “But as BJ matured he wanted to challenge himself as a writer. He wanted to be not just a good punk rock song writer but a good song writer.

“For The Search, this an era of experimentation.”

AS A pint-sized rocker, Kyle Hannah featured on American pop punk band Green Day’s website. Now a teenage drummer with The Search, Kyle and his band mates Ethan Hannah (lead singer/rhythm guitar), Kees Albers-Connolly (lead guitar) and Ben Allan (bass), look forward to their Green Day tribute gig at Smash Palace.

“We’ve all been fans of Green Day, especially Ethan and I, since we were four and five year olds and saw the American Idiot video,” says Kyle.

For the Green Day website picture, Kyle dressed up as singer-lead guitarist Billy Joe Armstrong and struck a rock star pose.

The band has long dreamed of staging a Green Day tribute. News the five-time Grammy award winning band is coming to New Zealand in May galvanised The Search’s decision to make their dream come true.

“This is perfect timing for the gig,” says Kees.

“We’ve always wanted to do this,” says Kyle. “I’ve always liked Green Day’s fast, upbeat tempo and memorable guitar riffs. As I grow up I like their political stance, especially in the new album, Revolution Radio.”

“There is something about the lead guitarist’s sound and style that is inspirational,” says Kees.

“There’s a simplicity but it’s his own sound.”

“For the tribute, we try to do exactly what they do,” says Ethan. “My voice suits Billy Joe’s. His range is like mine.”

“The way Ethan sings helped with our decision to do the tribute,” says Kyle. “We got in touch with Darryl Monteith at Smash Palace and he gave us the green light.”

Because the lads are underage they have to finish rocking the palace by 10pm. And they need to be accompanied by an adult.

“Our parents always come to our gigs to support us, anyway,” says Kyle.

The young musicians met while at Gisborne Intermediate and formed The Search in 2013. In the same year they performed in the regional Smokefree Rockquest.

Ben joined The Search in 2014. The band came third in the regional event that year, second in 2015 and took first place last year.

“We’ve got better every year,” says Kyle.

The band’s repertoire is mostly made up of covers but as the musicians mature they perform more and more originals penned by Kyle.

“Our older songs are not so serious and meaningful,” he says.

“But now he’s going to parties he’s getting more of a developed philosophy on life,” says Kees.

“When Green Day first started they were a hard core punk rock band like us,” says Kyle. “But as BJ matured he wanted to challenge himself as a writer. He wanted to be not just a good punk rock song writer but a good song writer.

“For The Search, this an era of experimentation.”

The Search present a Green Day tribute at Smash Palace on April 29.

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