100 Day Project

Two Bit Punk by Lina Marsh
Día de Muertos, Day of the Dead hei tiki by Lina Marsh
Toimaikuku, Maori nail designs by Terangi Kutia-Tataurangi
Tattoo designs by Manila born painter and tattoo designer Sarah Kane-Matete.

EIGHT artists, 100 days. Each artist chooses one creative activity and repeats it with a fresh work every day.

If the challenge sounds like something from an episode of Survivor, that’s not too far off the mark — except the artists are not marooned on an island and can participate from anywhere in the world.

“In order to survive this 100-day marathon you need to be disciplined, have creative flexibility and lots and lots of energy,” says New Zealand graphic designer Emma Rogan who founded the project in 2011.

Here’s how it works.

Having last year produced a work in their chosen field each day for 100 days, the artists will now exhibit prints of that work at Tairawhiti Museum. At the same time, they will embark on another 100-day project for 2017.

Worth playing for?

Lina Marsh thinks so.

The artist created a tiki template she then traced for each drawing, in which she explored pattern-making. She developed her daily designs around themes and linked each one with a song. Among the hei tiki pictures is her work from day 18, Two Bit Punk From Frisco, an image she created in pencil, ink pens and instant coffee on card.

Two bit punk

“Two bit punk” was one of many phrases used by Marsh’s late father-in-law, a former merchant navy man whose various tattoos included an anchor on his chest.

The song Marsh linked to Two Bit Punk is the 1976 hit Beat on the Brat, by American punk band the Ramones.

Marsh’s day 69 design, dyed with food colouring, touches on Día de Muertos, Day of the Dead, Mexico’s celebration of life held on November 2. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ song Deanna is linked to the work.

Some tiki are a response to what was happening at the time, and some touch on political issues, says Marsh, but her favourite moment was transforming a friend into a hei tiki for his birthday.

“I laughed and laughed throughout creating the piece because it looks exactly like him.”

Creative beauty and nail technician Terangi Kutia-Tataurangi brought her unique nail painting and construction designs to the project.

Toimaikuku - Maori nail designs

To create toimaikuku, Maori nail designs, the Toihoukura Maori visual arts school graduate conceptualises her designs and refines them to fit within a fingernail, she says.

The 100 Day Project presented her with an opportunity to be more expressive.

For the project, her toimaikuku were “inspired by an emotion, a feeling, an experience, a topic or an event of that day”.

“On the spot and with little conceptual thought at all. With each design, I took the opportunity to work on my online branding by getting creative with my images.”

A descendant of the Bicol, Ilocano and Pasig tribes of the Philippines, Manila-born painter and Filipino tattoo designer Sarah Kane-Matete explored improvised works for the project. Kane-Matete aspires to learn more about ancient tattoo practices, particularly that of the Philippines in hand tap and hand poke, but the improvised works showcase another style of her work, she says.

“My challenge was to create designs that are available to be tattooed on people.”

A dedicated gallery space has been given over to the exhibition which opens with a group show. This will be followed by solo shows through to December that allow the artists to present the original, larger works.

Works from the project can be viewed under the name Kraf-Tin at www.100daysproject.co.nz

EIGHT artists, 100 days. Each artist chooses one creative activity and repeats it with a fresh work every day.

If the challenge sounds like something from an episode of Survivor, that’s not too far off the mark — except the artists are not marooned on an island and can participate from anywhere in the world.

“In order to survive this 100-day marathon you need to be disciplined, have creative flexibility and lots and lots of energy,” says New Zealand graphic designer Emma Rogan who founded the project in 2011.

Here’s how it works.

Having last year produced a work in their chosen field each day for 100 days, the artists will now exhibit prints of that work at Tairawhiti Museum. At the same time, they will embark on another 100-day project for 2017.

Worth playing for?

Lina Marsh thinks so.

The artist created a tiki template she then traced for each drawing, in which she explored pattern-making. She developed her daily designs around themes and linked each one with a song. Among the hei tiki pictures is her work from day 18, Two Bit Punk From Frisco, an image she created in pencil, ink pens and instant coffee on card.

Two bit punk

“Two bit punk” was one of many phrases used by Marsh’s late father-in-law, a former merchant navy man whose various tattoos included an anchor on his chest.

The song Marsh linked to Two Bit Punk is the 1976 hit Beat on the Brat, by American punk band the Ramones.

Marsh’s day 69 design, dyed with food colouring, touches on Día de Muertos, Day of the Dead, Mexico’s celebration of life held on November 2. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ song Deanna is linked to the work.

Some tiki are a response to what was happening at the time, and some touch on political issues, says Marsh, but her favourite moment was transforming a friend into a hei tiki for his birthday.

“I laughed and laughed throughout creating the piece because it looks exactly like him.”

Creative beauty and nail technician Terangi Kutia-Tataurangi brought her unique nail painting and construction designs to the project.

Toimaikuku - Maori nail designs

To create toimaikuku, Maori nail designs, the Toihoukura Maori visual arts school graduate conceptualises her designs and refines them to fit within a fingernail, she says.

The 100 Day Project presented her with an opportunity to be more expressive.

For the project, her toimaikuku were “inspired by an emotion, a feeling, an experience, a topic or an event of that day”.

“On the spot and with little conceptual thought at all. With each design, I took the opportunity to work on my online branding by getting creative with my images.”

A descendant of the Bicol, Ilocano and Pasig tribes of the Philippines, Manila-born painter and Filipino tattoo designer Sarah Kane-Matete explored improvised works for the project. Kane-Matete aspires to learn more about ancient tattoo practices, particularly that of the Philippines in hand tap and hand poke, but the improvised works showcase another style of her work, she says.

“My challenge was to create designs that are available to be tattooed on people.”

A dedicated gallery space has been given over to the exhibition which opens with a group show. This will be followed by solo shows through to December that allow the artists to present the original, larger works.

Works from the project can be viewed under the name Kraf-Tin at www.100daysproject.co.nz

The 100 Day Project group exhibition opens at Tairawhiti Museum tomorrow. Solo exhibitions open from July 19.

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