Talks fast, kind of mumbly, one of us

THE MAN FROM CHILE: You’ve seen him on satirical panel show 7 Days and in Kiwi vampire flick What We Do In The Shadows. Now Chile-born comedian Cori Gonzales-Macuer is coming to Gisborne.
Picture supplied

AT A recent corporate gig, comedian Cori Gonzales-Macuer had a request from someone in the audience to do the one about his mate and the Taranaki woman.

In the gag, a cousin from Chile has conjugal relations with a “full-on chick from Taranaki”.

Gonzales-Macuer gets down on his knees to play out the scene as the Taranaki woman.

“Taranaki-Wellington this weekend. Looking forward to that one,” he says over his shoulder.

“I met the Mad Butcher the other day. He is pretty mad actually.”

The comedian stops rocking and stands up.

“I can’t believe I just did that on national TV,” he says.

He’s really like us, says one fan in a documentary about the Chile-born New Zealander who performs at Soho next week.

“He’s like our generation. He doesn’t do big gags. He’s not loud. He talks quite fast, he kind of mumbles.”

He talks quite fast, he kind of mumbles and he brings a deadpan, slightly anxious, but dark edge to his delivery — but it is a long way from Chilean humour, he says.

“In Chile it’s more slapstick with more innuendo and puns.”

He does observational, day-to-day-based comedy that is mostly one-liner driven, such as this dry cracker from the televised live Aotearoha show.

“Does anybody feel bad for gang members who get the flu — but won’t be able to get flu medicine from pharmacies?”

Gonzales-Macuer says he was never the class clown at school and didn’t find his calling as a stand-up comedian until he was at university and saw Samoan-Welsh comedian James Nokise at a comedy club. A few comedy club shows later he signed up for a competition run by comedian Ben Hurley.

Gonzales-Macuer won.

Comedy has come a long way

Comedy has come a long way in New Zealand, he says.

“When I started there wasn’t much around except Pulp Comedy on TV.”

With its origins in Auckland’s Comedyfest which provided an outlet for the city’s burgeoning early ‘90s stand-up scene, Pulp Comedy provided a platform for stand-up comics, says NZ Onscreen.

The show provided national exposure for novices as well as leading lights like Mike King, Ewen Gilmour, Flight of the Conchords, Michele A’Court, Brendhan Lovegrove, Philip Patston and Cal Wilson.

“Back in the day people used to criticise comedy on TV. Live comedy on TV is better. It’s more out there.It’s more diverse.”

Satirical panel show 7 Days has helped New Zealand stand-up comedy, says Gonzales-Macuer. Rather than the story-telling style of delivery by many comedians on British comedy programme Live at the Apollo, the rapid-fire format suits him well.

“I’d love to be a story-teller but I get nervous if I don’t get a laugh every minute or so. I’ve done shows in some towns to literally eight people. You need those gigs to make you good as a comedian.”

He has performed in most places in New Zealand.

“The ones I enjoy the most I go back to,” he says.

Gisborne is among those places.

AT A recent corporate gig, comedian Cori Gonzales-Macuer had a request from someone in the audience to do the one about his mate and the Taranaki woman.

In the gag, a cousin from Chile has conjugal relations with a “full-on chick from Taranaki”.

Gonzales-Macuer gets down on his knees to play out the scene as the Taranaki woman.

“Taranaki-Wellington this weekend. Looking forward to that one,” he says over his shoulder.

“I met the Mad Butcher the other day. He is pretty mad actually.”

The comedian stops rocking and stands up.

“I can’t believe I just did that on national TV,” he says.

He’s really like us, says one fan in a documentary about the Chile-born New Zealander who performs at Soho next week.

“He’s like our generation. He doesn’t do big gags. He’s not loud. He talks quite fast, he kind of mumbles.”

He talks quite fast, he kind of mumbles and he brings a deadpan, slightly anxious, but dark edge to his delivery — but it is a long way from Chilean humour, he says.

“In Chile it’s more slapstick with more innuendo and puns.”

He does observational, day-to-day-based comedy that is mostly one-liner driven, such as this dry cracker from the televised live Aotearoha show.

“Does anybody feel bad for gang members who get the flu — but won’t be able to get flu medicine from pharmacies?”

Gonzales-Macuer says he was never the class clown at school and didn’t find his calling as a stand-up comedian until he was at university and saw Samoan-Welsh comedian James Nokise at a comedy club. A few comedy club shows later he signed up for a competition run by comedian Ben Hurley.

Gonzales-Macuer won.

Comedy has come a long way

Comedy has come a long way in New Zealand, he says.

“When I started there wasn’t much around except Pulp Comedy on TV.”

With its origins in Auckland’s Comedyfest which provided an outlet for the city’s burgeoning early ‘90s stand-up scene, Pulp Comedy provided a platform for stand-up comics, says NZ Onscreen.

The show provided national exposure for novices as well as leading lights like Mike King, Ewen Gilmour, Flight of the Conchords, Michele A’Court, Brendhan Lovegrove, Philip Patston and Cal Wilson.

“Back in the day people used to criticise comedy on TV. Live comedy on TV is better. It’s more out there.It’s more diverse.”

Satirical panel show 7 Days has helped New Zealand stand-up comedy, says Gonzales-Macuer. Rather than the story-telling style of delivery by many comedians on British comedy programme Live at the Apollo, the rapid-fire format suits him well.

“I’d love to be a story-teller but I get nervous if I don’t get a laugh every minute or so. I’ve done shows in some towns to literally eight people. You need those gigs to make you good as a comedian.”

He has performed in most places in New Zealand.

“The ones I enjoy the most I go back to,” he says.

Gisborne is among those places.

Cori Gonzales-Macuer performs at the Soho Bar on July 15, 7.30pm $20.Tickets available from 0800 BUY TIX (289 849)

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.