Double bill at the Dome

ALBI & THE WOLVES: “Soulful folk rock” act Albi & The Wolves’ bass player Micheal Young (left), guitarist/vocalist Chris Dent and Pascal Roggen on electric violin perform at the Dome Room tomorrow. Pictures supplied
LOOKING FOR ALASKA: Former Gisborne woman Amy Maynard (left) and Aaron Gott will be joined by drummer Willam Page and bass player Stephen Daniels when their band Looking For Alaska performs in a double-bill at the Dome tomorrow.

AS BAND names Looking for Alaska and Albi & The Wolves suggest the two acts are in the same world, but they are different, says Looking for Alaska guitarist/singer Aaron Gott.

Looking for Alaska’s music is more at the folk end of the spectrum. Gott and former Gisborne woman Amy Maynard had not long been romantically tied when the four-piece recorded its first album, Looking for Alaska.

“A lot of the songs are about love,” says Gott. “A lot of folk bands and singers do love-gone-wrong songs but ours are positive, in-love songs. We make light of that sometimes in our shows.”

The band is made up of drummer Willam Page and bassist Stephen Daniels while Gott and Maynard play guitar and sing.

Fresh material written for a yet-to-be-recorded second album will be part of Looking for Alaska’s repertoire when they join Albi & The Wolves for a double-billing at the Dome on Friday.

“It’s an accessible sound. Our vocal harmonies are at the forefront of what we do,” says Gott. “Some of our songs are uplifting and dancey, and some are more reflective and more downbeat. We try to take people on a journey in our shows.”

The commonality in the two bands’ names is accidental, says Gott.

“We’re good friends and they do a similar thing, but we are named after a book title. We really liked the name.”

Albi, or Chris Dent of Albi & The Wolves, earned his nickname on account of his albinism, he says.

“I’ve got a big white beard. I use my albinism as my thing.”

And the wolves?

“We like the sound of the wolf pack, which is kind of what we do. We make a lot of sound for a three-piece.”

The three-piece is made up of Dent on guitar and vocals, bass guitarist Micheal Young and Pascal Roggen on electric violin. They have a unique sound that goes beyond country and wanders, like a wolf pack, yes, into new terrain.

“We’re not quite bluegrass, not quite folk,” says Dent. “We’re soulful folk rock.”

AS BAND names Looking for Alaska and Albi & The Wolves suggest the two acts are in the same world, but they are different, says Looking for Alaska guitarist/singer Aaron Gott.

Looking for Alaska’s music is more at the folk end of the spectrum. Gott and former Gisborne woman Amy Maynard had not long been romantically tied when the four-piece recorded its first album, Looking for Alaska.

“A lot of the songs are about love,” says Gott. “A lot of folk bands and singers do love-gone-wrong songs but ours are positive, in-love songs. We make light of that sometimes in our shows.”

The band is made up of drummer Willam Page and bassist Stephen Daniels while Gott and Maynard play guitar and sing.

Fresh material written for a yet-to-be-recorded second album will be part of Looking for Alaska’s repertoire when they join Albi & The Wolves for a double-billing at the Dome on Friday.

“It’s an accessible sound. Our vocal harmonies are at the forefront of what we do,” says Gott. “Some of our songs are uplifting and dancey, and some are more reflective and more downbeat. We try to take people on a journey in our shows.”

The commonality in the two bands’ names is accidental, says Gott.

“We’re good friends and they do a similar thing, but we are named after a book title. We really liked the name.”

Albi, or Chris Dent of Albi & The Wolves, earned his nickname on account of his albinism, he says.

“I’ve got a big white beard. I use my albinism as my thing.”

And the wolves?

“We like the sound of the wolf pack, which is kind of what we do. We make a lot of sound for a three-piece.”

The three-piece is made up of Dent on guitar and vocals, bass guitarist Micheal Young and Pascal Roggen on electric violin. They have a unique sound that goes beyond country and wanders, like a wolf pack, yes, into new terrain.

“We’re not quite bluegrass, not quite folk,” says Dent. “We’re soulful folk rock.”

Looking For Alaska and Albi & The Wolves, The Dome Room, Friday (8pm), Tickets $15 from the Aviary or Eventfinda or $20 at the door.

Two free tickets are available. Just name the author of the book Looking For Alaska. Send your answer to guide@gisborneherald.co.nz

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