Light, sacred symmetry, rock

WONDER: Close up images of delicate and strong structures in nature are part of Gisborne artist Jo Tito’s solo exhibition at Tairawhiti Gallery.
Pictures by Jo Tito

LIGHT and perspective are key to photography, Gisborne artist Jo Tito tells her students.

“If you can’t ‘see’ and compose a great image, no flash technology will help you.”

The nature images in her solo show, a spin-off from the 100 Days Project in which participants engaged in one art activity a day for 100 days, were taken with her phone.

“It’s amazing what you can do with technology these days.”

The exhibition is a small collection of art works Tito created during the 100 days project in 2014 to her current 365 day nature haiku project. The project can be followed on Instagram @wonderingearth.

Among pictures in Tito’s solo exhibition at Tairawhiti Museum is an intimate close-up of an unfurling tendril with sunlight diffused through its translucent greens.

In a close-up of a water-splashed harakeke (flax) blade, the fine lines of the plant’s fibres can be seen.

Mandala digitally created from a detail in a picture from nature line the walls. The rock Tito inscribed with a painted design on day 144 of her 2011 rock a day project presents a kind of full-stop to the show.

“It comes from the Whanganui River and carries the energy or mauri of my rock a day project and this exhibition. I painted my first rock in 1998 while living in Auckland and two years later decided to move home to Taranaki, closer to my source so I could be with my whenua and continue my rock painting journey.”

Tito’s first “something a day” project was in 2011 when she painted a rock every day for 365 days.

“I photographed each rock, wrote a story for the day and shared it online at www.handpaintedrocks.com.”

LIGHT and perspective are key to photography, Gisborne artist Jo Tito tells her students.

“If you can’t ‘see’ and compose a great image, no flash technology will help you.”

The nature images in her solo show, a spin-off from the 100 Days Project in which participants engaged in one art activity a day for 100 days, were taken with her phone.

“It’s amazing what you can do with technology these days.”

The exhibition is a small collection of art works Tito created during the 100 days project in 2014 to her current 365 day nature haiku project. The project can be followed on Instagram @wonderingearth.

Among pictures in Tito’s solo exhibition at Tairawhiti Museum is an intimate close-up of an unfurling tendril with sunlight diffused through its translucent greens.

In a close-up of a water-splashed harakeke (flax) blade, the fine lines of the plant’s fibres can be seen.

Mandala digitally created from a detail in a picture from nature line the walls. The rock Tito inscribed with a painted design on day 144 of her 2011 rock a day project presents a kind of full-stop to the show.

“It comes from the Whanganui River and carries the energy or mauri of my rock a day project and this exhibition. I painted my first rock in 1998 while living in Auckland and two years later decided to move home to Taranaki, closer to my source so I could be with my whenua and continue my rock painting journey.”

Tito’s first “something a day” project was in 2011 when she painted a rock every day for 365 days.

“I photographed each rock, wrote a story for the day and shared it online at www.handpaintedrocks.com.”

Jo Tito’s solo show, @wonderingearth, Tairawhiti Museum, until October 8.

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