Nanogirl's science explodes on stage

EXCITING SCIENCE: Otherwise known as Nanogirl, Dr Michelle Dickinson (right) mixes science education and entertainment with explosive results, as Gisborne and East Coast audiences will see tomorrow at her and sidekick Boris’s show, Nanogirl Live. Picture supplied

FEW kids have thought of converting the household vacuum cleaner into a marshmallow cannon, but that will change tomorrow night.

Dr Michelle Dickinson, otherwise known as Nanogirl, with her fumbling sidekick Boris, is in Gisborne with a show based on engineering magic.

“I teach him how to re-engineer magic tricks,” Dr Dickinson said.

“We learn how it works and Nanogirl shows him the engineering behind it. The show is about building stuff out of what you find around your home.”

In one show, Nanogirl showed the audience how to build a hovercraft with a leaf-blower, shower curtain and a plank.

“In Gisborne we will show kids how to build a marshmallow cannon from a vacuum cleaner.”

Even though young scientists and engineers will learn how to change the airflow on the vacuum cleaner, the machine will still function normally, Dr Dickinson said.

She describes the show as “edutainment”. It is designed for five to 12-year-olds and promises to be fun for all the family.

"It’s a ridiculous fun show. We do experiments where kids come up on stage and do them with us. You can’t be what you can’t see. That’s why we’re bringing Nanogirl Live to towns across the country.

“We want to engage as many young New Zealanders as we can in the magic of science and engineering.

“We are a country of innovators. We make amazing things from stuff around us. We want to instil that in our kids. They can be problem solvers."

Rocket Lab is about to elevate the New Zealand economy and the country needs to diversify its markets from traditional industries, Dr Dickinson said.

The Nanogirl team works closely with Mind Lab and is interested in building problem-solving confidence and curiosity in kids.

“There is a lot of technology we are really good at.”

The Nanogirl Live, engineering magic tour, is designed to be accessible. ECT has bought 120 tickets for Gisborne and East Coast children. Around the country, 200 patrons of Nanogirl shows have bought tickets for kids in this region.

The “pay-it-forward” initiative means customers have an opportunity to buy a ticket that will then be given to someone who would otherwise not be able to attend.

FEW kids have thought of converting the household vacuum cleaner into a marshmallow cannon, but that will change tomorrow night.

Dr Michelle Dickinson, otherwise known as Nanogirl, with her fumbling sidekick Boris, is in Gisborne with a show based on engineering magic.

“I teach him how to re-engineer magic tricks,” Dr Dickinson said.

“We learn how it works and Nanogirl shows him the engineering behind it. The show is about building stuff out of what you find around your home.”

In one show, Nanogirl showed the audience how to build a hovercraft with a leaf-blower, shower curtain and a plank.

“In Gisborne we will show kids how to build a marshmallow cannon from a vacuum cleaner.”

Even though young scientists and engineers will learn how to change the airflow on the vacuum cleaner, the machine will still function normally, Dr Dickinson said.

She describes the show as “edutainment”. It is designed for five to 12-year-olds and promises to be fun for all the family.

"It’s a ridiculous fun show. We do experiments where kids come up on stage and do them with us. You can’t be what you can’t see. That’s why we’re bringing Nanogirl Live to towns across the country.

“We want to engage as many young New Zealanders as we can in the magic of science and engineering.

“We are a country of innovators. We make amazing things from stuff around us. We want to instil that in our kids. They can be problem solvers."

Rocket Lab is about to elevate the New Zealand economy and the country needs to diversify its markets from traditional industries, Dr Dickinson said.

The Nanogirl team works closely with Mind Lab and is interested in building problem-solving confidence and curiosity in kids.

“There is a lot of technology we are really good at.”

The Nanogirl Live, engineering magic tour, is designed to be accessible. ECT has bought 120 tickets for Gisborne and East Coast children. Around the country, 200 patrons of Nanogirl shows have bought tickets for kids in this region.

The “pay-it-forward” initiative means customers have an opportunity to buy a ticket that will then be given to someone who would otherwise not be able to attend.

Nanogirl Live, War Memorial Theatre, tomorrow, 5pm and 7pm. Tickets from Stephen Jones Photography and TicketDirect.

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