Three flutes to play in music competiton

WINDS IN BOSTON: Gisborne flute player Matthew Lee completed his masters degree at Canterbury University last year and next month begins study in Boston for a diploma in performance. He is particularly grateful for arts patron Professor Jack Richards’ sponsorship, he says.
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THE wildly exuberant 20th century jazz composition Zoom Tube was not picked by jurors from Gisborne International Music Competition entrant Matthew Lee’s selection of performance works, but they did choose another engaging 20th century piece.

Having completed his Master of Music degree this year Lee returned to his home town to perform in the competition.

Among the selections he made for the competition is New Zealand composer Maria Grenfell’s In which Christopher Robin leads an Expedition to the North Pole, and In which Pooh and Piglet go Hunting and nearly catch a Woozle, works the jurors did select for Lee to perform in the first round of the competition.

“They are well-known flute pieces,” says Lee.

"They are light and playful, like Winnie the Pooh. The performer has to switch between portraying different characters. You portray Pooh so you become him.

“It’s nice to see how Maria chose to portray each character.”

In the past year Lee has freelanced as a flute player and teacher around Christchurch. He has also put time into preparation for auditions towards enrolment in doctoral study overseas next year.

THE wildly exuberant 20th century jazz composition Zoom Tube was not picked by jurors from Gisborne International Music Competition entrant Matthew Lee’s selection of performance works, but they did choose another engaging 20th century piece.

Having completed his Master of Music degree this year Lee returned to his home town to perform in the competition.

Among the selections he made for the competition is New Zealand composer Maria Grenfell’s In which Christopher Robin leads an Expedition to the North Pole, and In which Pooh and Piglet go Hunting and nearly catch a Woozle, works the jurors did select for Lee to perform in the first round of the competition.

“They are well-known flute pieces,” says Lee.

"They are light and playful, like Winnie the Pooh. The performer has to switch between portraying different characters. You portray Pooh so you become him.

“It’s nice to see how Maria chose to portray each character.”

In the past year Lee has freelanced as a flute player and teacher around Christchurch. He has also put time into preparation for auditions towards enrolment in doctoral study overseas next year.

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