Back to the garden with Rhythm and Vines

BEHIND THE SCENES AT R&V: Rhythm and Vines art department manager Johnny Gibbs (left) and Ryan Ledger are part of a team whose creativity will help light up the festival site. Picture by Liam Clayton

WE ARE stardust, we are golden and we got to get ourselves back to the garden, sings Joni Mitchell in her tribute to the 1969 Woodstock music festival.

Rhythm and Vines (R&V) art department member Ryan Ledger is making sure no one, golden or even a bit dusty, will miss the garden at the Waiohika Estate-based festival. The garden stage is a new feature at this year’s R&V and one of Ledger’s jobs is to design and plot lighting for the stage.

“This is the first time the garden will be open to the public,” says the Wintec media arts graduate. “Our job is to make sure everyone see it.”

During the festival Ledger will put his degree major in film to use when he photographs and videos the festival for archival purposes.

“We want a record of what went on and to see what worked and what we can improve on,” says art department manager Johnny Gibbs.

Ledger looks forward to continuing to follow his passion in the new year.

“I’ve always been interested in the entertainment industry. I studied film for four years and did videos within the music industry. The festival is a chance to network with other artists.

“The team here is great. We work hard but there’s always a laugh as well.”

The R&V art department team has a lot more work to do this year than in previous years, says Gibbs.

“This year’s festival has a bigger focus so we’ve been able to be a lot more creative this year.”

Toihoukura Maori visual arts and design school graduates have created large feather-like cut-outs from plywood and stencil-patterned them. They have also made decorated surfboard, tiki and manaia forms that will be hung around the site.

Art department team members have created and erected signage and flags, decorated the water tanks and dressed marquees with a kilometre of brightly coloured organza (silk fabric). They will festoon the site with about 100 colourful, paper honeycomb balls. Team members will also hang mirror balls, says Jess Quilter.

“The disco balls go into the trees. The lights go under them so the disco balls shine over everyone.

“It’s going to look epic,” she says.

WE ARE stardust, we are golden and we got to get ourselves back to the garden, sings Joni Mitchell in her tribute to the 1969 Woodstock music festival.

Rhythm and Vines (R&V) art department member Ryan Ledger is making sure no one, golden or even a bit dusty, will miss the garden at the Waiohika Estate-based festival. The garden stage is a new feature at this year’s R&V and one of Ledger’s jobs is to design and plot lighting for the stage.

“This is the first time the garden will be open to the public,” says the Wintec media arts graduate. “Our job is to make sure everyone see it.”

During the festival Ledger will put his degree major in film to use when he photographs and videos the festival for archival purposes.

“We want a record of what went on and to see what worked and what we can improve on,” says art department manager Johnny Gibbs.

Ledger looks forward to continuing to follow his passion in the new year.

“I’ve always been interested in the entertainment industry. I studied film for four years and did videos within the music industry. The festival is a chance to network with other artists.

“The team here is great. We work hard but there’s always a laugh as well.”

The R&V art department team has a lot more work to do this year than in previous years, says Gibbs.

“This year’s festival has a bigger focus so we’ve been able to be a lot more creative this year.”

Toihoukura Maori visual arts and design school graduates have created large feather-like cut-outs from plywood and stencil-patterned them. They have also made decorated surfboard, tiki and manaia forms that will be hung around the site.

Art department team members have created and erected signage and flags, decorated the water tanks and dressed marquees with a kilometre of brightly coloured organza (silk fabric). They will festoon the site with about 100 colourful, paper honeycomb balls. Team members will also hang mirror balls, says Jess Quilter.

“The disco balls go into the trees. The lights go under them so the disco balls shine over everyone.

“It’s going to look epic,” she says.

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