Jerseybob coming to Gisborne

JERSEYBOB: The long-haired guitarist-singer Jerseybob and his cajon-playing wife Monika are described by Ken Fairs as bringing to their shows “heartfelt folk music with a twist of laughter and some far fetched yarns”. Picture supplied

SOULS from the 1960s can still be found on Nepal’s hippie trail and it was one such seeker who opened up a new world of musicianship for Jersey man Bob Vincent.

“He tuned my guitar all weird with open tuning,” says the singer-guitarist better known as Jerseybob.

“That changed my whole world. I thought he’d broken my guitar at first but I was trying to play normal chords. I took it back to him and he showed me a year’s worth of chords.

“He said ‘now go and write your own stuff.”

During a three month stint in India, Vincent wrote everything in open tuning. At a rooftop restaurant during the Festival of Light, he was inspired by a passing “angel” to write Always Gonna Fly. His YouTube clip of the song even comes with the open tuning plan: D A D G B D.

After exploring the open tuning in D he found about 12 more tunings to use including the one in E in which the six guitar strings are tuned to E E E E B E.

“The Es resonate together,” he says. “You get this rich tone.”

In a song about his parents called Ancestors he uses that tuning. A high, haunting harmonic like a violin or human vocal note lifts out of it.

“There must be more to music than 12 notes,” says Vincent.

“Hidden notes come out sometimes.”

Vincent plays a guitar made from Hawaiian koa wood and even though he had originally ordered a Japanese model he is more than happy with the Hawaiian model. It comes to life when plugged in, he says.

“I’ve tried lots of guitars but nothing sounds as nice. A lot of people ask how I get that sound. It’s picked up the vibes from all the countries I’ve been in.”

Travel and music go hand in hand for the troubadour. He and his cajon-playing wife Monika don’t go anywhere without a show as a go-to point, he says. When the couple went to her homeland of South Africa five years ago to get married, Vincent landed 20 shows during their two and a half months stay. At one gig, he sold 57 albums.

Not bad going for a former Pro-Am cyclist who did not pick up the guitar until he was 26 years old. Since then he has always travelled with a guitar.

“Every time you travel you meet someone who is really good on guitar.”

The prolific songwriter/performer and wife Monika are now gearing up to bring their open-tuned, folk-infused music to the Dome room next Thursday.

Although Bob Dylan, Neil Young and John Prine figure among his musical influences, and some of his cover tunes, his repertoire now includes humorous songs.

“One of them is the sordid tale of a guy who drives around New Zealand trying to squash mynah birds.”

The song is named after a chord: A Flat Mynah.

SOULS from the 1960s can still be found on Nepal’s hippie trail and it was one such seeker who opened up a new world of musicianship for Jersey man Bob Vincent.

“He tuned my guitar all weird with open tuning,” says the singer-guitarist better known as Jerseybob.

“That changed my whole world. I thought he’d broken my guitar at first but I was trying to play normal chords. I took it back to him and he showed me a year’s worth of chords.

“He said ‘now go and write your own stuff.”

During a three month stint in India, Vincent wrote everything in open tuning. At a rooftop restaurant during the Festival of Light, he was inspired by a passing “angel” to write Always Gonna Fly. His YouTube clip of the song even comes with the open tuning plan: D A D G B D.

After exploring the open tuning in D he found about 12 more tunings to use including the one in E in which the six guitar strings are tuned to E E E E B E.

“The Es resonate together,” he says. “You get this rich tone.”

In a song about his parents called Ancestors he uses that tuning. A high, haunting harmonic like a violin or human vocal note lifts out of it.

“There must be more to music than 12 notes,” says Vincent.

“Hidden notes come out sometimes.”

Vincent plays a guitar made from Hawaiian koa wood and even though he had originally ordered a Japanese model he is more than happy with the Hawaiian model. It comes to life when plugged in, he says.

“I’ve tried lots of guitars but nothing sounds as nice. A lot of people ask how I get that sound. It’s picked up the vibes from all the countries I’ve been in.”

Travel and music go hand in hand for the troubadour. He and his cajon-playing wife Monika don’t go anywhere without a show as a go-to point, he says. When the couple went to her homeland of South Africa five years ago to get married, Vincent landed 20 shows during their two and a half months stay. At one gig, he sold 57 albums.

Not bad going for a former Pro-Am cyclist who did not pick up the guitar until he was 26 years old. Since then he has always travelled with a guitar.

“Every time you travel you meet someone who is really good on guitar.”

The prolific songwriter/performer and wife Monika are now gearing up to bring their open-tuned, folk-infused music to the Dome room next Thursday.

Although Bob Dylan, Neil Young and John Prine figure among his musical influences, and some of his cover tunes, his repertoire now includes humorous songs.

“One of them is the sordid tale of a guy who drives around New Zealand trying to squash mynah birds.”

The song is named after a chord: A Flat Mynah.

Jerseybob and Our Monika play at the Dome garden bar next Thursday from 6pm. Free entry.

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