A Cutts above the rest

STANDOUT BRASS: The Colin Nunns cup was named in honour of Gisborne Civic Brass Band member Colin Nunns (right). In this 1965 Gisborne Photo News picture, he plays the cornet in a concert before leaving for the New Zealand Championships. Gisborne Photo News No 132: June 16, 1965
THE SOUND OF BRASS: The Gisborne Civic Brass Band’s Rod Cutts double B flat tuba specialist has been awarded the inaugural Colin Nunns cup. Cutts is pictured here standing next to the image of himself in a mural painted by the late Graeme Mudge on the Band Room wall. Picture by Liam Clayton

AS percussion player for the Gisborne Civic Brass Band, Rod Cutts had to tote a van load of equipment to performances. Other musicians carried their instruments in cases, he noticed, so he took up brass, he says (he likes a laugh), notably the trombone and the double B flat tuba.

For his dedication to the Gisborne Civic Brass Band (GCBB), Cutts has now been awarded the inaugural Colin Nunns cup.

Nunns was a GCBB member who began playing brass as a five-year- old. His playing is said to have had a “beautiful, warm sound that made you want to hear more.”

Conductor Chris Reynolds nominated Cutts for the Colin Nunns cup “for his input throughout the year”.

“He’s my father-in-law so he gave me his daughter to marry,” says Reynolds.

Reynolds also taught Cutts the trombone.

That’s not a bad deal.

“You better ask my daughter about that,” laughs Cutts.

Cutts has been with the GCBB for 30 years. When his eldest son was in the band he would take him to practice. The band needed a percussion player so Cutts signed up. When the band found it was in need of a double B flat tuba player, he stepped up and took on the role.

Cutts’ father performed with the New Zealand Army Band and with the Salvation Army band. His youngest son plays with the Marlborough District Brass Band, which ranks among New Zealand’s top A Grade bands.

“We’ve been brought up with brass band music,” says Cutts.

“I used to go to parades to watch the band and just to hear them. Now you go to a parade and everyone is watching you.”

AS percussion player for the Gisborne Civic Brass Band, Rod Cutts had to tote a van load of equipment to performances. Other musicians carried their instruments in cases, he noticed, so he took up brass, he says (he likes a laugh), notably the trombone and the double B flat tuba.

For his dedication to the Gisborne Civic Brass Band (GCBB), Cutts has now been awarded the inaugural Colin Nunns cup.

Nunns was a GCBB member who began playing brass as a five-year- old. His playing is said to have had a “beautiful, warm sound that made you want to hear more.”

Conductor Chris Reynolds nominated Cutts for the Colin Nunns cup “for his input throughout the year”.

“He’s my father-in-law so he gave me his daughter to marry,” says Reynolds.

Reynolds also taught Cutts the trombone.

That’s not a bad deal.

“You better ask my daughter about that,” laughs Cutts.

Cutts has been with the GCBB for 30 years. When his eldest son was in the band he would take him to practice. The band needed a percussion player so Cutts signed up. When the band found it was in need of a double B flat tuba player, he stepped up and took on the role.

Cutts’ father performed with the New Zealand Army Band and with the Salvation Army band. His youngest son plays with the Marlborough District Brass Band, which ranks among New Zealand’s top A Grade bands.

“We’ve been brought up with brass band music,” says Cutts.

“I used to go to parades to watch the band and just to hear them. Now you go to a parade and everyone is watching you.”

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