Rhythm and Vines rap up

HANDS IN THE AIR: An MC performing on Rhythm and Vines’ main stage holds a massive crowd in his thrall. Picture supplied
SCHOOLED: Hardcore rapper Schoolboy Q’s big bass beats fill the Vines stage on day one of the R&V festival. Picture supplied
MAN’S NOT COLD: British rapper, actor and comedian Michael Dapaah, best known as his fictional character MC Big Shaq, keeps his jacket on for his performance of the viral YouTube hit Man’s Not Hot.
SPACE AGE: EDM — electronic dance music — was the big attraction for the 20,000 R&V festival-goers and the pulse never stopped in the laser-lit Rhythm Supertop. Picture supplied
R & V
2017-18 festival. Picture by Liam Clayton
FROM THE TOP: Viewed from the hillside, thousands of party people in front of the main stage. Picture supplied

THE wildly energetic, pumping pop-up city that was the Rhythm and Vines music festival has packed up and gone for another year. The new year festival event will be back next summer but here’s a chance to relive a few moments from R&V 2017.

Day 1

After the rain, the trek from car park checkpoint to the bag and body search marquee, and the final identity bracelet scan lanes, was a long, muddy sneaker-sucking haul. But no one seemed to care.

The heaving, roaring, steaming population in front of the main stage absorbed newcomers. Torrents of people flooded up and down the hillside above the stage. They slid through the mud as they made their way to and from the Vines Stage, the Rhythm Supertop, the Cellar Stage among the trees, the new Garden Stage built on the Waiohika Estate tennis court; the camp sites and the food outlet zones.

With his menacing beats and moody backing tracks, hip-hop act Schoolboy Q was a highlight for the festival’s first night.

Day 2

British rapper, actor and comedian Michael Dapaah, best known as his fictional character MC Big Shaq was one of the most anticipated acts on the second day at the festival.

Big Shaq’s YouTube hits Man’s Not Hot, and Man’s Not Cold have gone viral but the rap artist preferred to be just Michael Dapaah for his interview with the Gisborne Herald.

He could turn his MC Big Shaq character on at will, he said.

“He’s a character I’ve been playing for a while so it’s something you can turn on and off when he needs to be on or off, you know what I’m saying?

“Man’s Not Hot is not the first song we ever released. One of my other characters, MC Quakez, he’s got other songs as well we released before. Man’s Not Hot is the first tune that’s gone BOOM, you know what I’m saying?”

The hit song is not a parody of rap. It is rap with a comedic twist, he said.

“If it was parody it would be more like taking the mick out of mainstream rap. I believe if it was a parody it wouldn’t be received the way it’s been received.

“Some people are very dark with their music. Some people are more light-hearted with it. Some people like to have fun with it.

“Big Shaq just likes to make music which is true to him.”

Man’s Not Hot has had hundreds of millions of streams online, he said. It has sold more than a million singles worldwide.

Big Shaq - ‘Mans Not Hot’ Live at Rhythm and Vines

Day 3

New Zealand rapper Savage’s DJ set on the last night led 20,000 party people towards 2018 at Gisborne’s 15th Rhythm and Vines music festival last night.

Kiwi artists P-Money, David Dallas, Savage and a surprise appearance by Scribe topped three days of music across four stages at the festival before drum and bass heavyweights Netsky and Wilkinson took over for the final countdown.

New Zealand artists David Dallas, P-Money, Scribe and Savage led the 20,000 strong crowd towards 2018 on the final night of the festival. Drum and bass heavyweights Netsky and Wilkinson took over for the 2017 countdown video and fireworks display at midnight.

“It’s a freaking sick time!” said party person Nikkie Turpie — but it’s unlikely she was referring to the 15 people who were hospitalised due to vomiting and diarrhoea that could have been due to norovirus.

In an interview with the 1ZB breakfast show, Gisborne Herald reporter Mark Peters said there was no confirmation at that stage a virus was the cause of their illness and that it would be unfair to pinpoint the festival as the source.

“Hundreds of people flooded into town each day to enjoy our eateries and a read of The Gisborne Herald,” he said.

“The hospital did the right thing in isolating the 15 people in case it was a norovirus. It would take only one orgy among the vines for the bug to spread like wildfire.”

In response to a question about the glitter-painted, bare-breasted woman seen at the festival site, Peters said bare-breastedness was normal at 1970s music festivals such as Nambassa and Sweetwaters.

Asked about the footage of the glitter-breasted woman at R&V who slapped and hit the man who scooted down the slope to tweak a breast before he ran back to his mates, Peters said the man deserved what he got.

There was nothing salacious in what the woman at R&V did, he said.

“She was just part of the beautiful energy and the beautiful atmosphere out there.”

THE wildly energetic, pumping pop-up city that was the Rhythm and Vines music festival has packed up and gone for another year. The new year festival event will be back next summer but here’s a chance to relive a few moments from R&V 2017.

Day 1

After the rain, the trek from car park checkpoint to the bag and body search marquee, and the final identity bracelet scan lanes, was a long, muddy sneaker-sucking haul. But no one seemed to care.

The heaving, roaring, steaming population in front of the main stage absorbed newcomers. Torrents of people flooded up and down the hillside above the stage. They slid through the mud as they made their way to and from the Vines Stage, the Rhythm Supertop, the Cellar Stage among the trees, the new Garden Stage built on the Waiohika Estate tennis court; the camp sites and the food outlet zones.

With his menacing beats and moody backing tracks, hip-hop act Schoolboy Q was a highlight for the festival’s first night.

Day 2

British rapper, actor and comedian Michael Dapaah, best known as his fictional character MC Big Shaq was one of the most anticipated acts on the second day at the festival.

Big Shaq’s YouTube hits Man’s Not Hot, and Man’s Not Cold have gone viral but the rap artist preferred to be just Michael Dapaah for his interview with the Gisborne Herald.

He could turn his MC Big Shaq character on at will, he said.

“He’s a character I’ve been playing for a while so it’s something you can turn on and off when he needs to be on or off, you know what I’m saying?

“Man’s Not Hot is not the first song we ever released. One of my other characters, MC Quakez, he’s got other songs as well we released before. Man’s Not Hot is the first tune that’s gone BOOM, you know what I’m saying?”

The hit song is not a parody of rap. It is rap with a comedic twist, he said.

“If it was parody it would be more like taking the mick out of mainstream rap. I believe if it was a parody it wouldn’t be received the way it’s been received.

“Some people are very dark with their music. Some people are more light-hearted with it. Some people like to have fun with it.

“Big Shaq just likes to make music which is true to him.”

Man’s Not Hot has had hundreds of millions of streams online, he said. It has sold more than a million singles worldwide.

Big Shaq - ‘Mans Not Hot’ Live at Rhythm and Vines

Day 3

New Zealand rapper Savage’s DJ set on the last night led 20,000 party people towards 2018 at Gisborne’s 15th Rhythm and Vines music festival last night.

Kiwi artists P-Money, David Dallas, Savage and a surprise appearance by Scribe topped three days of music across four stages at the festival before drum and bass heavyweights Netsky and Wilkinson took over for the final countdown.

New Zealand artists David Dallas, P-Money, Scribe and Savage led the 20,000 strong crowd towards 2018 on the final night of the festival. Drum and bass heavyweights Netsky and Wilkinson took over for the 2017 countdown video and fireworks display at midnight.

“It’s a freaking sick time!” said party person Nikkie Turpie — but it’s unlikely she was referring to the 15 people who were hospitalised due to vomiting and diarrhoea that could have been due to norovirus.

In an interview with the 1ZB breakfast show, Gisborne Herald reporter Mark Peters said there was no confirmation at that stage a virus was the cause of their illness and that it would be unfair to pinpoint the festival as the source.

“Hundreds of people flooded into town each day to enjoy our eateries and a read of The Gisborne Herald,” he said.

“The hospital did the right thing in isolating the 15 people in case it was a norovirus. It would take only one orgy among the vines for the bug to spread like wildfire.”

In response to a question about the glitter-painted, bare-breasted woman seen at the festival site, Peters said bare-breastedness was normal at 1970s music festivals such as Nambassa and Sweetwaters.

Asked about the footage of the glitter-breasted woman at R&V who slapped and hit the man who scooted down the slope to tweak a breast before he ran back to his mates, Peters said the man deserved what he got.

There was nothing salacious in what the woman at R&V did, he said.

“She was just part of the beautiful energy and the beautiful atmosphere out there.”

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