Nga Tipu gallery opens in Gladstone Rd

SEEDLINGS: Fiona Bryant and her sister Toni Sadlier in the new gallery. Picture by Liam Clayton

AN eye-catching dress made from harakeke accessorised with a matching flax pod choker is part of Nga Tipu gallery’s showcase window display.

Situated on the Gladstone Road-Lowe Street corner the gallery is in a central location but to entice passersby, Nga Tipu owner Fiona Bryant installed a striking window display. Bryant’s sister Toni Sadlier made the harakeke dress for a wearable art show.

Nga Tipu gallery’s focus is to bring artists and like-minded people with a common vision together, says Bryant.

“The work is predominantly Maori but we do have other artists’ work as well. The gallery is about getting back to basics.” Hence the name Nga Tipu (seedlings).

Along with work by artists such as Linda Appleby, Horowai Stewart, Adrienne Douglas, Phil Berry and Jean Johnson, Nga Tipu sells pre-loved goods, locally grown organic produce, manuka honey and even bromeliads.

“We started with a handful of mostly potters, weavers and painters and have grown extensively since then,” says Bryant.

“If the community supports us we will carry on."

AN eye-catching dress made from harakeke accessorised with a matching flax pod choker is part of Nga Tipu gallery’s showcase window display.

Situated on the Gladstone Road-Lowe Street corner the gallery is in a central location but to entice passersby, Nga Tipu owner Fiona Bryant installed a striking window display. Bryant’s sister Toni Sadlier made the harakeke dress for a wearable art show.

Nga Tipu gallery’s focus is to bring artists and like-minded people with a common vision together, says Bryant.

“The work is predominantly Maori but we do have other artists’ work as well. The gallery is about getting back to basics.” Hence the name Nga Tipu (seedlings).

Along with work by artists such as Linda Appleby, Horowai Stewart, Adrienne Douglas, Phil Berry and Jean Johnson, Nga Tipu sells pre-loved goods, locally grown organic produce, manuka honey and even bromeliads.

“We started with a handful of mostly potters, weavers and painters and have grown extensively since then,” says Bryant.

“If the community supports us we will carry on."

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