Big Saturday surfing line up

COLD WATER SURF: A surfer hits the icy lip of a wave in Perilous Sea, one of a selection of movies in Saturday’s O’Neill Aotearoa Surf Film Festival.
Picture supplied
This scene appears in Nervous Laughter, photographed by Erik Aeder.

The line-up of feature films to screen at the O’Neill Aotearoa Surf Film Festival (ASFF) in Gisborne on Saturday includes pulse-racing, scalp-tingling, scrote-prickling movies such as UK director Mike Bromley’s Perilous Sea.

Bromley’s film of a transcontinental cold water surfing odyssey opens the one-day event at the Dome cinema. As with all features screened during the surf movie fest, it will be accompanied by a selection of New Zealand and international films from the ASFF short film competition. That all of these films are packed with knockout cinematography and pumping soundtracks goes without saying.

Perilous Sea follows a group of surfers as they explore the cold water surf and character of the North Atlantic’s fringes. The bonneted and bootied ocean-farers’ journey takes in the coasts of the Canadian Maritimes, Iceland and Ireland.

Fish People by Keith Malloy (USA) is as much about swimming, diving and spearfishing as it is about surfing in terms of engagement of the soul with the sea.

“For each of us it’s our own private church, our private temple,” says one of a cast of unique characters.

“It soothes pains that are real.”

Totally expect “no freaking way” moments in US director Dan Norkunas’s movie about gigantic wave riding in Nervous Laughter. The inhuman break known as Peahi, or Jaws is the protagonist in this movie of the crew of disparate characters who take on waves up to 18 metres high, and with attitude to match, off the north shore of Maui.

The El Nino of 2016 promised to serve up the largest swells in big-wave history.

“It’s a question on everyone’s mind if it’s going to be do-able,” says one of the crew.

The line-up of feature films to screen at the O’Neill Aotearoa Surf Film Festival (ASFF) in Gisborne on Saturday includes pulse-racing, scalp-tingling, scrote-prickling movies such as UK director Mike Bromley’s Perilous Sea.

Bromley’s film of a transcontinental cold water surfing odyssey opens the one-day event at the Dome cinema. As with all features screened during the surf movie fest, it will be accompanied by a selection of New Zealand and international films from the ASFF short film competition. That all of these films are packed with knockout cinematography and pumping soundtracks goes without saying.

Perilous Sea follows a group of surfers as they explore the cold water surf and character of the North Atlantic’s fringes. The bonneted and bootied ocean-farers’ journey takes in the coasts of the Canadian Maritimes, Iceland and Ireland.

Fish People by Keith Malloy (USA) is as much about swimming, diving and spearfishing as it is about surfing in terms of engagement of the soul with the sea.

“For each of us it’s our own private church, our private temple,” says one of a cast of unique characters.

“It soothes pains that are real.”

Totally expect “no freaking way” moments in US director Dan Norkunas’s movie about gigantic wave riding in Nervous Laughter. The inhuman break known as Peahi, or Jaws is the protagonist in this movie of the crew of disparate characters who take on waves up to 18 metres high, and with attitude to match, off the north shore of Maui.

The El Nino of 2016 promised to serve up the largest swells in big-wave history.

“It’s a question on everyone’s mind if it’s going to be do-able,” says one of the crew.

The nationwide ASFF 2018 opens at the Dome on Saturday at 6.30pm.

Trailers can be viewed at www.asff.co.nz/#films.

Go to the programme and online booking link

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