The power of three

FROM ROMANTIC TO CONTEMPORARY: Musica Viva’s programme continues with a performance by chamber music trio Toru which is made up of Ingrid Bauer, Sophie Acheson and Karen Batten. Picture supplied

A mix of romantic and contemporary works make up New Zealand chamber music trio Toru’s programme for their concert in Gisborne next week.

Named after the Maori word for three Toru’s harp, flute and viola are a combination of instruments 19th-20th century French composer Debussy is said to have popularised with his Sonate en trio, a piece that features in Toru’s programme.

The programme includes works by Beethoven along with a viola solo written by 19th-20th century British post-romantic composer Arnold Bax; 20th century, Welsh, Zodiac Trio composer William Mathias and the quirky character pieces of 21st century German composer Wendelin Bitzan’s Zoological Garden. Twenty-nine-year-old New Zealand composer Tabea Squire’s Impressions (New Work) brings another modern flavour to the programme.

Brought to Gisborne as part of Chamber Music New Zealand’s “music up close” tour, and hosted by Musica Viva, are Karen Batten (flute), Sophia Acheson (viola) and Ingrid Bauer (harp). The three women are section principals with Orchestra Wellington.

Bauer has been described by the Huntington Estate Music Festival’s artistic director, Carl Vine, as a “fantastic new find”. She has performed with various orchestras as well as with Australian jazz legend James Morrison and is a founding member of the Australian harp septet SHE.

Flute player Batten is principal flute for Orchestra Wellington and often works with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Chamber music is a passion for Batten. She has been part of several groups, including Ethos (flute, clarinet and piano) and Elios (flute and strings) which have toured for Chamber Music New Zealand.

During her viola training in Wellington, Barcelona, California and Texas, Acheson furthered an interest in early music, learning the viola d’amore, a seven or six-stringed Baroque instrument with sympathetic strings, and viola da gamba, a late 15th century bowed, fretted and stringed instrument that is positioned between the legs like a cello.

Toru performs at St Andrew’s Church on Friday, May 25, 7.30pm. Entry $30, students $10.

A mix of romantic and contemporary works make up New Zealand chamber music trio Toru’s programme for their concert in Gisborne next week.

Named after the Maori word for three Toru’s harp, flute and viola are a combination of instruments 19th-20th century French composer Debussy is said to have popularised with his Sonate en trio, a piece that features in Toru’s programme.

The programme includes works by Beethoven along with a viola solo written by 19th-20th century British post-romantic composer Arnold Bax; 20th century, Welsh, Zodiac Trio composer William Mathias and the quirky character pieces of 21st century German composer Wendelin Bitzan’s Zoological Garden. Twenty-nine-year-old New Zealand composer Tabea Squire’s Impressions (New Work) brings another modern flavour to the programme.

Brought to Gisborne as part of Chamber Music New Zealand’s “music up close” tour, and hosted by Musica Viva, are Karen Batten (flute), Sophia Acheson (viola) and Ingrid Bauer (harp). The three women are section principals with Orchestra Wellington.

Bauer has been described by the Huntington Estate Music Festival’s artistic director, Carl Vine, as a “fantastic new find”. She has performed with various orchestras as well as with Australian jazz legend James Morrison and is a founding member of the Australian harp septet SHE.

Flute player Batten is principal flute for Orchestra Wellington and often works with the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra. Chamber music is a passion for Batten. She has been part of several groups, including Ethos (flute, clarinet and piano) and Elios (flute and strings) which have toured for Chamber Music New Zealand.

During her viola training in Wellington, Barcelona, California and Texas, Acheson furthered an interest in early music, learning the viola d’amore, a seven or six-stringed Baroque instrument with sympathetic strings, and viola da gamba, a late 15th century bowed, fretted and stringed instrument that is positioned between the legs like a cello.

Toru performs at St Andrew’s Church on Friday, May 25, 7.30pm. Entry $30, students $10.

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