A door slams, a shadow appears and a puddle

TIME TRAVEL TROUBLE: A scene from The Great Great Mistake. Film crew Kratos took out first place in the regional HP48Hours filmmaking competition. Picture supplied
BLOOD IS THICKER THAN WINE: Cowps Productions’ film The Harvest takes place in a winery. A new staff member doesn’t realise his co-workers are vampires. “We made the vampires a bit pale, serious and dressed in black,” said camerman Ben Cowper. Picture supplied

A twist to the theme of time travel won film crew Kratos first place in the regional HP48Hours filmmaking competition.

Kratos team members Jordan Perry, Clarke Allen, Jonathan Poole, Grant Ensor, Paddy Butler and Mike Morrissey came up with a twist on the well-tested conundrum: if you change the past how does it affect the future?

In a story that switches between the past and present day, Kratos’s short film, The Great Great Mistake, opens in the 1900s with one man chasing another. One of the two men is killed and the pursuer takes a pounamu necklace out of the dead man’s pocket.

“Flash forward to the present,” says cameraman Perry.

“Two guys are going through their great-great-grandfather’s stuff in a shed and they come across the necklace. As soon as they pick it up they go back to that day in the 1900s when the guy was killed.

“From there, they jump between past and present as they decide what to do.”

The men plan to go back to the shed but this time they will take a gun to scare the killer.

“The victim grabs the gun and kills the killer. As soon as he’s dead the two men rush over and check the dead guy because no one was meant to get killed.”

When the men find items that belonged to their great-great-grandfather on the dead man the audience knows they have cause his death.

“The film ends with the men as they fade away.”

Kratos blended the elements of a puddle, a shadow and a door slam allocated to all crews into the story. At the start the dead man lays in a puddle of his own blood. When the present-day men pick up the pounamu necklace the lights go out, a shadow appears on the wall and a door slams.

That got a big audience response at the finals, says Perry.

“Quite a few kids had to leave the screening.”

B Negative

Slapstick was the theme given to the Yeah Nah Entertainment film crew.
“We knew we had to do something over the top, gory and funny,” says director Andrew Blake.

As regular contributors to their YouTube channel, the three-man crew was already in the process of building a film set so they used the portal that was part of it as a starting point for thie film B Negative.

The plot of the crew’s film B Negative is hard to pin down, says Blake, but central to the action is the mystery around the reason for the portal’s presence — what it is and where it leads to.

“We don’t allude to what it does. It’s a weird anomaly but a crucial plot point. One of the characters sticks his finger in the portal and loses it.”

The same character puts a puppy into the portal. Same result. The story escalates when he encourages a neighbour to enter the portal. That person had a reason for going through the portal but Blake doesn’t want to give away too much.

“When that person comes back they’re not quite right. He can’t help but fight the other guy.”
The still from the film depicts a moment in which the two men pause during a bloody scrap to chat.

“We sent one of the guys to the supermarket with a fake blood recipe that included water, icing sugar, cocoa and food colouring. He came back with fake blood and slabs of meat.”

The slamming door element was fairly generic but a “practical”, rather than special, effect was used to create a shadow that moved around the room.

The puddle, of course, was blood. A close-up shot of one of the men’s faces as it was slammed into the puddle was shot through the bottom of a clear container.

Blake also won the Best Director, Best Script, and Best Animation/VFX awards.

Second runner-up in the regional HP48Hours filmmaking competition is Cowps Productions’ film The Harvest.

The crew chose a winery as the location for the film.

“The winery was different,” says cameraman Ben Cowper.

“You had all the machinery and barrels — that was something we thought might stand out.”

The location also provided a platform for their allocated theme of “fish out of water”.

“We came up with the idea of a guy looking for a job but people working at the winery are a bit strange, a bit off. The guy doesn’t know what’s going on. The weird thing about the workers is they’re vampires. We made them a bit pale and serious and dressed in black.”

Tor Bjorn Ahman played the main vampire so his accent lent itself to his character, says Cowper.

“The idea was for viewers to know something was off without being obvious.”

The sound effect, of a slamming door when the job seeker enters the building, would have something to do with that.

The job seeker (Jeff Rangihuna) is offered a glass of wine that is of course blood. He is taken outside where he sees a body (Cowper) in a barrel.

“The vampire says ‘this is how we make our wine’.”

Shot at night and backlit in his plastic barrel “in the freezing rain”, Cowper was the shadow in his container.

The puddle was blood.

Given the short film’s title, how the job plays out for the new guy is fairly inexorable. At the end of the movie he is one of the vampires and another job seeker turns up looking for work. For his performance in the Michale Hollis-directed film Rangihuna was named by the judges as best performer.

A twist to the theme of time travel won film crew Kratos first place in the regional HP48Hours filmmaking competition.

Kratos team members Jordan Perry, Clarke Allen, Jonathan Poole, Grant Ensor, Paddy Butler and Mike Morrissey came up with a twist on the well-tested conundrum: if you change the past how does it affect the future?

In a story that switches between the past and present day, Kratos’s short film, The Great Great Mistake, opens in the 1900s with one man chasing another. One of the two men is killed and the pursuer takes a pounamu necklace out of the dead man’s pocket.

“Flash forward to the present,” says cameraman Perry.

“Two guys are going through their great-great-grandfather’s stuff in a shed and they come across the necklace. As soon as they pick it up they go back to that day in the 1900s when the guy was killed.

“From there, they jump between past and present as they decide what to do.”

The men plan to go back to the shed but this time they will take a gun to scare the killer.

“The victim grabs the gun and kills the killer. As soon as he’s dead the two men rush over and check the dead guy because no one was meant to get killed.”

When the men find items that belonged to their great-great-grandfather on the dead man the audience knows they have cause his death.

“The film ends with the men as they fade away.”

Kratos blended the elements of a puddle, a shadow and a door slam allocated to all crews into the story. At the start the dead man lays in a puddle of his own blood. When the present-day men pick up the pounamu necklace the lights go out, a shadow appears on the wall and a door slams.

That got a big audience response at the finals, says Perry.

“Quite a few kids had to leave the screening.”

B Negative

Slapstick was the theme given to the Yeah Nah Entertainment film crew.
“We knew we had to do something over the top, gory and funny,” says director Andrew Blake.

As regular contributors to their YouTube channel, the three-man crew was already in the process of building a film set so they used the portal that was part of it as a starting point for thie film B Negative.

The plot of the crew’s film B Negative is hard to pin down, says Blake, but central to the action is the mystery around the reason for the portal’s presence — what it is and where it leads to.

“We don’t allude to what it does. It’s a weird anomaly but a crucial plot point. One of the characters sticks his finger in the portal and loses it.”

The same character puts a puppy into the portal. Same result. The story escalates when he encourages a neighbour to enter the portal. That person had a reason for going through the portal but Blake doesn’t want to give away too much.

“When that person comes back they’re not quite right. He can’t help but fight the other guy.”
The still from the film depicts a moment in which the two men pause during a bloody scrap to chat.

“We sent one of the guys to the supermarket with a fake blood recipe that included water, icing sugar, cocoa and food colouring. He came back with fake blood and slabs of meat.”

The slamming door element was fairly generic but a “practical”, rather than special, effect was used to create a shadow that moved around the room.

The puddle, of course, was blood. A close-up shot of one of the men’s faces as it was slammed into the puddle was shot through the bottom of a clear container.

Blake also won the Best Director, Best Script, and Best Animation/VFX awards.

Second runner-up in the regional HP48Hours filmmaking competition is Cowps Productions’ film The Harvest.

The crew chose a winery as the location for the film.

“The winery was different,” says cameraman Ben Cowper.

“You had all the machinery and barrels — that was something we thought might stand out.”

The location also provided a platform for their allocated theme of “fish out of water”.

“We came up with the idea of a guy looking for a job but people working at the winery are a bit strange, a bit off. The guy doesn’t know what’s going on. The weird thing about the workers is they’re vampires. We made them a bit pale and serious and dressed in black.”

Tor Bjorn Ahman played the main vampire so his accent lent itself to his character, says Cowper.

“The idea was for viewers to know something was off without being obvious.”

The sound effect, of a slamming door when the job seeker enters the building, would have something to do with that.

The job seeker (Jeff Rangihuna) is offered a glass of wine that is of course blood. He is taken outside where he sees a body (Cowper) in a barrel.

“The vampire says ‘this is how we make our wine’.”

Shot at night and backlit in his plastic barrel “in the freezing rain”, Cowper was the shadow in his container.

The puddle was blood.

Given the short film’s title, how the job plays out for the new guy is fairly inexorable. At the end of the movie he is one of the vampires and another job seeker turns up looking for work. For his performance in the Michale Hollis-directed film Rangihuna was named by the judges as best performer.

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