Diving into a moon shaped pool

HAIL: Radiohead tribute band Hail to the Thieves explore the technical, experimental, layered sound of the English band’s alternative, electronic, art rock sound. Picture supplied

The technical, experimental prowess and intelligence of Radiohead is the inspiration for the English band’s tribute act Hail to the Thieves, says guitarist Ben Throp.

The complex, nuanced sound, and time signature changes in Radiohead songs make them “really challenging to learn”.

“Every album is different from the previous one, they change their sound so often. Radiohead is the most inspirational band for most of Hail to the Thieves’ members.”

Many people are familiar with two or three Radiohead songs, such as their first single Creep which was a worldwide hit after the release of their debut album, Pablo Honey, says Throp.

With its complex production and themes of modern alienation, it was Radiohead’s third album, OK Computer, that propelled the band to international fame.

After the success of OK Computer, Radiohead vocalist Thom Yorke responded with Kid A “which was completely different, says Throp. Along with Amnesiac, the album is said to have marked a dramatic change in style that incorporated influences from experimental electronic music, 20th Century classical music, krautrock, and jazz.

“They’re a fascinating band to uncover. The more you uncover their music the more you’re blown away. On their album Kid A there are hardly any guitars.”

A YouTube clip of Radiohead’s song From the Basement, from the album In Rainbows was the clincher for Throp in starting Hail to the Thieves.

“How they set up in that recording session is what I strive for. Everyone is playing at the same time and getting an amazing sound in the room.

“You see how three guitarists work alone but work together.”

Throp recommends viewing the clip which cane be seen at tinyurl.com/lqycjhm.

Hail To The Thieves derived their name from Radiohead’s sixth album, Hail to the Thief which mixes rock and electronic music.

The tribute band includes Throp, Willie Devine, Bysshe Blackburn, Jason Johnston and Jeff Boyle. Guitarist Boyle is part of instrumental three-piece Jakob which won the Taite Music Prize in 2016. Singer-songwriter Throp has made three albums himself.

As with Radiohead, Hail to the Thieves has three guitarists “all doing different things”.

For their gig at the Dome next week, Hail to the Thieves will perform their interpretations of some of Radiohead’s work that spans 25 years and nine studio albums.

“When audience’s leave one of our gigs they’re blown away by the quality of the songs,” says Throp.

Hail To The Thieves, the Dome Room, June 30, 8.30pm. $20 on the door.

The technical, experimental prowess and intelligence of Radiohead is the inspiration for the English band’s tribute act Hail to the Thieves, says guitarist Ben Throp.

The complex, nuanced sound, and time signature changes in Radiohead songs make them “really challenging to learn”.

“Every album is different from the previous one, they change their sound so often. Radiohead is the most inspirational band for most of Hail to the Thieves’ members.”

Many people are familiar with two or three Radiohead songs, such as their first single Creep which was a worldwide hit after the release of their debut album, Pablo Honey, says Throp.

With its complex production and themes of modern alienation, it was Radiohead’s third album, OK Computer, that propelled the band to international fame.

After the success of OK Computer, Radiohead vocalist Thom Yorke responded with Kid A “which was completely different, says Throp. Along with Amnesiac, the album is said to have marked a dramatic change in style that incorporated influences from experimental electronic music, 20th Century classical music, krautrock, and jazz.

“They’re a fascinating band to uncover. The more you uncover their music the more you’re blown away. On their album Kid A there are hardly any guitars.”

A YouTube clip of Radiohead’s song From the Basement, from the album In Rainbows was the clincher for Throp in starting Hail to the Thieves.

“How they set up in that recording session is what I strive for. Everyone is playing at the same time and getting an amazing sound in the room.

“You see how three guitarists work alone but work together.”

Throp recommends viewing the clip which cane be seen at tinyurl.com/lqycjhm.

Hail To The Thieves derived their name from Radiohead’s sixth album, Hail to the Thief which mixes rock and electronic music.

The tribute band includes Throp, Willie Devine, Bysshe Blackburn, Jason Johnston and Jeff Boyle. Guitarist Boyle is part of instrumental three-piece Jakob which won the Taite Music Prize in 2016. Singer-songwriter Throp has made three albums himself.

As with Radiohead, Hail to the Thieves has three guitarists “all doing different things”.

For their gig at the Dome next week, Hail to the Thieves will perform their interpretations of some of Radiohead’s work that spans 25 years and nine studio albums.

“When audience’s leave one of our gigs they’re blown away by the quality of the songs,” says Throp.

Hail To The Thieves, the Dome Room, June 30, 8.30pm. $20 on the door.

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