Dancing in the Moonlight

MOONLIT: The wall on the right of Atarau: Moonlight, a children’s exhibition that explores native nocturnal birds and insects of this region, features a wall of decorated wooden, leaf-like shapes (above). Each one is threaded at one end by a piece of string. Known as purerehua, they are a type of instrument that makes a sound when swung in the air. Purerehua is also a generic name for native New Zealand moths. Picture by Rebecca Grunwell

Interactivity is what an exhibition by children for children at Tairawhiti Museum is all about.

Atarau: Moonlight is set in a low-lit, grotto-like gallery and features a lightbox desk with “illuminating facts” about wildlife such as the katipo (night stinger) and kuaka (bar-tailed godwit).

A foliage entangled disc on the wall presents a virtual glow-worm habitat. A grassy reading corner under a backlit Perspex panel that features a full moon offers kids soft toys and a carving.

One wall is covered with painted leaf forms while petalled, moon-like orbs hang from the ceiling.

The museum’s education team worked with schools to create the collaborative exhibition. Students created their own work and contributed to a class artwork. This was inspired by the works of artists who examine similar environmental themes that include plant life, wildlife and the landscape as depicted by artists and described in explorer James Cook’s journals from his 1769 visit.

Atarau: Moonlight, Tairawhiti Museum until November 4.

Interactivity is what an exhibition by children for children at Tairawhiti Museum is all about.

Atarau: Moonlight is set in a low-lit, grotto-like gallery and features a lightbox desk with “illuminating facts” about wildlife such as the katipo (night stinger) and kuaka (bar-tailed godwit).

A foliage entangled disc on the wall presents a virtual glow-worm habitat. A grassy reading corner under a backlit Perspex panel that features a full moon offers kids soft toys and a carving.

One wall is covered with painted leaf forms while petalled, moon-like orbs hang from the ceiling.

The museum’s education team worked with schools to create the collaborative exhibition. Students created their own work and contributed to a class artwork. This was inspired by the works of artists who examine similar environmental themes that include plant life, wildlife and the landscape as depicted by artists and described in explorer James Cook’s journals from his 1769 visit.

Atarau: Moonlight, Tairawhiti Museum until November 4.

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