When Gisborne becomes G-town

At least 50 international acts lined up for Rhythm and Vines.

At least 50 international acts lined up for Rhythm and Vines.

DAMN HIPPIES: Not only is high-energy Dunedin band Soaked Oats named after a breakfast product that is good for your bowels, they play guitars and stuff - even at Rhythm and Vines! Soaked Oats’ songs Avocado Aficionado, and Stoned Fruit, brought to the stage ‘60s Californian pop-song flavours mixed with Jonathan Richmond (Modern Lovers) irony.

With at least 50 international acts lined up for New Zealand’s longest-running music festival, Rhythm and Vines, the world is well and truly coming to Gisborne.

The headline act for the festival’s first night is Chicago rapper Juice WRLD who has bumped Drake and Kanye West off the top spot on Spotify since the release of his debut album Goodbye & Good Riddance.

Specialising in narcotic slow jams that feature sexually frank lyrics, often in falsetto is Toronto-based alternative R&B act DVSN who also perform on December 29.

Miami-based rapper and producer Smokepurpp headlines the hip-hop billing for December 30. One of the original Soundcloud rappers, his lo-fi rap and trap has garnered millions of streams globally.

Also performing on the same night is Brighton-based drum and bass producer Friction. After soaring to success in the early 2000s, Friction (Ed Keeley) is said to be one of the most recognised names in bass music today. As one of a handful of drum and bass DJs who uses three decks to mash up his mixes, he is regarded as the most adept and ferocious DJ/producer in the scene.

'A white boy with soul'

Another global hitmaker-of-the-year to come to Gisborne, and taking the stage at 6pm on New Year’s Eve, is Sydney singer/songwriter Dean Lewis whose Be Alright went viral.

Described by American rapper Pharrell as “a white boy with soul”, Liverpool producer and songwriter SG Lewis will be bringing his electronic music with its emotive narratives and a deep club thump to the stage on New Year’s Eve.

Pioneer prototypes test-pilot James Zabiela is reportedly one of dance music’s premiere technical wizards. The British DJ turns CDJs (specialised digital music players for deejaying) into a bona fide instrument in a way that only a handful of DJs have ever been able to.

British turntable act Jack Beats, and electronic music duo from London, will feature on the Vapo Cellar Stage on New Year’s Eve.

Acts named in the first release include Californian rapper, actor and member of hip-hop trio Cutthroat Boyz, Vince Staples. Staples’ second album Big Fish Theory incorporates avant-garde, dance and electronic influences. He has also featured on Gorillaz’s album Humanz and appeared in the movies Dope, and Sprite.

English record producer, DJ and remixer, aka Mark Wilkinson’s first insight into making music came at age nine when his parents bought him a drum kit. Known now as Wilkinson Live, young Mark played at venues such as the Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre and the city’s rest homes. In his final year at college he began to make his own beats and in 2013 released his single Afterglow which reached number 8 in the UK singles chart.

Tchami x Malaa, a French record producer and DJ from Paris, Tchami (or Martin Joseph Léonard Bresso to his mum) is regarded as a pioneer of the future house genre. Appearing in public as a balaclava-wearing man, electronic music DJ and producer Malaa’s identity is unknown. He is signed to Tchami’s label Confession and broke onto the electronic music scene with his single Notorious.

As with every year, Rhythm and Vines’ opening and headliner slots are filled by New Zealand musicians. Among new additions are Ian Munro, SWIDT, N eo, Mild Orange, LA Women and Mini Simmons. More than 60 Kiwi acts will perform at the festival this year including Dunedin band Soaked Oats.

Rhythm and Vines runs from December 28 until January 1 at Waiohika Estate.

With at least 50 international acts lined up for New Zealand’s longest-running music festival, Rhythm and Vines, the world is well and truly coming to Gisborne.

The headline act for the festival’s first night is Chicago rapper Juice WRLD who has bumped Drake and Kanye West off the top spot on Spotify since the release of his debut album Goodbye & Good Riddance.

Specialising in narcotic slow jams that feature sexually frank lyrics, often in falsetto is Toronto-based alternative R&B act DVSN who also perform on December 29.

Miami-based rapper and producer Smokepurpp headlines the hip-hop billing for December 30. One of the original Soundcloud rappers, his lo-fi rap and trap has garnered millions of streams globally.

Also performing on the same night is Brighton-based drum and bass producer Friction. After soaring to success in the early 2000s, Friction (Ed Keeley) is said to be one of the most recognised names in bass music today. As one of a handful of drum and bass DJs who uses three decks to mash up his mixes, he is regarded as the most adept and ferocious DJ/producer in the scene.

'A white boy with soul'

Another global hitmaker-of-the-year to come to Gisborne, and taking the stage at 6pm on New Year’s Eve, is Sydney singer/songwriter Dean Lewis whose Be Alright went viral.

Described by American rapper Pharrell as “a white boy with soul”, Liverpool producer and songwriter SG Lewis will be bringing his electronic music with its emotive narratives and a deep club thump to the stage on New Year’s Eve.

Pioneer prototypes test-pilot James Zabiela is reportedly one of dance music’s premiere technical wizards. The British DJ turns CDJs (specialised digital music players for deejaying) into a bona fide instrument in a way that only a handful of DJs have ever been able to.

British turntable act Jack Beats, and electronic music duo from London, will feature on the Vapo Cellar Stage on New Year’s Eve.

Acts named in the first release include Californian rapper, actor and member of hip-hop trio Cutthroat Boyz, Vince Staples. Staples’ second album Big Fish Theory incorporates avant-garde, dance and electronic influences. He has also featured on Gorillaz’s album Humanz and appeared in the movies Dope, and Sprite.

English record producer, DJ and remixer, aka Mark Wilkinson’s first insight into making music came at age nine when his parents bought him a drum kit. Known now as Wilkinson Live, young Mark played at venues such as the Birmingham’s National Exhibition Centre and the city’s rest homes. In his final year at college he began to make his own beats and in 2013 released his single Afterglow which reached number 8 in the UK singles chart.

Tchami x Malaa, a French record producer and DJ from Paris, Tchami (or Martin Joseph Léonard Bresso to his mum) is regarded as a pioneer of the future house genre. Appearing in public as a balaclava-wearing man, electronic music DJ and producer Malaa’s identity is unknown. He is signed to Tchami’s label Confession and broke onto the electronic music scene with his single Notorious.

As with every year, Rhythm and Vines’ opening and headliner slots are filled by New Zealand musicians. Among new additions are Ian Munro, SWIDT, N eo, Mild Orange, LA Women and Mini Simmons. More than 60 Kiwi acts will perform at the festival this year including Dunedin band Soaked Oats.

Rhythm and Vines runs from December 28 until January 1 at Waiohika Estate.

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