Takuahiroa - Light Box

STATES OF CREATIVE POTENTIAL: The new works of Kaaterina and Tai Kerekere take the form of digital printed lightboxes and other innovative interpretations in their latest exhibition, Takuahiroa. It will be on display at the HB Williams Memorial Library from Monday, November 12 to January 11. This lightbox is entitled Reborn is by Tai. Images supplied by Kaaterina and Tai Kerekere
Tuakana Teina is by Kaaterina.

Takuahiroa is that space of creation — a state of creative potential.This concept brings together the individual expressions of new work presented by husband-and-wife artists Kaaterina and Tai Kerekere. Their latest collaborative exhibition, Takuahiroa, goes on display at HB Williams Memorial Library from next Monday.

The body of work is a result of the pair’s recent Honours studies and is also a tribute to their beloved aunty and former librarian, the late Mako Allen.

“Over the past year, we have been studying towards a Bachelor of Professional Creative Practice (Honours),” said Kaaterina.

“The time has come to present the work we have created as a result of the research and development from the past several months work. Not only have we decided to present a collaborative approach, but we are honoured to dedicate this series of new work to our dearly missed Aunty Mako Allen, who passed away in August this year.”

Historically, Takuahiroa was a second location for the ancient school of higher learning — Te Whare Wananga o Te Rawheoro, at Kuratau, Mangaheia, Uawa.

While the location was Kuratau Valley, Mangaheia, the name Takuahiroa was given to the area in which various activities, duties and roles were carried out by students and tohunga of Te Whare Wananga o Te Rawheoro. This location still exists today and clear distinctions of the pa site can be recognised.

“Through this metaphor we investigate various mental and physical pathways of learning to attain matauranga maori,” said Kaaterina.

“We explore concepts of repository systems — Takuahiroa not only being a space for creative potential, but also being a space for storing knowledge.

“This space becomes a purpose for exhibition, our storehouse of knowledge, with the result of various research being our interpretation of the weaving together of concepts drawn from traditional knowledge and hapu narrative.”

Kaaterina’s new work combines properties of space, time and geometric figures to explore the concept of ‘The Whakairo of the Mind’, as discussed by Dr Wayne Ngata. Fusing traditional art and design foundations with modern design symbolism, Kaaterina works towards illuminating the ‘interpretation of a creative process’, the ‘conditioning of the mind to learn, to retain, to express, to create’.

“I want people to think beyond the tangible and look into the intangible creative.”

Tai’s new body of work is a progression from his previous series based around notions of identity. Under Takuahiroa, Tai looks to explore the human body as a vessel, to retain and pass on knowledge.

“Through our tipuna (ancestors), markers of DNA are passed down generations, markers that make us unique,” he said.

“Some of these genetic markers or groups of genes contribute to our physical make-up, for example, our height, body shape, skin colour, the colour of our eyes and hair. The genetic traits can also determine, or help recognise your talents, strengths and even weaknesses, to build on and develop.

“Traditional korero states that wananga were mainly for young men who were selected by their hapu and iwi to attend whare wananga. Some were selected based on their whakapapa, on their intellect, skill and perseverance of the skill or teachings.

“In some circumstances the men would be given various tests, or be set certain tasks to complete in aim to achieve permission or be selected.

“In other korero, tohunga would identify a child or children at an early age and watch over their learning, growth and development, to see if they had what was ‘required’ or ‘needed’ to attend whare wananga.”

A state of creative potential — Takuahiroa is Kaaterina and Tai’s metaphor for the legacy that has been handed down to them by their ancestors as artisans — a legacy that is designed through the weaving of the strands and seeds of creation.

Takuahiroa is that space of creation — a state of creative potential.This concept brings together the individual expressions of new work presented by husband-and-wife artists Kaaterina and Tai Kerekere. Their latest collaborative exhibition, Takuahiroa, goes on display at HB Williams Memorial Library from next Monday.

The body of work is a result of the pair’s recent Honours studies and is also a tribute to their beloved aunty and former librarian, the late Mako Allen.

“Over the past year, we have been studying towards a Bachelor of Professional Creative Practice (Honours),” said Kaaterina.

“The time has come to present the work we have created as a result of the research and development from the past several months work. Not only have we decided to present a collaborative approach, but we are honoured to dedicate this series of new work to our dearly missed Aunty Mako Allen, who passed away in August this year.”

Historically, Takuahiroa was a second location for the ancient school of higher learning — Te Whare Wananga o Te Rawheoro, at Kuratau, Mangaheia, Uawa.

While the location was Kuratau Valley, Mangaheia, the name Takuahiroa was given to the area in which various activities, duties and roles were carried out by students and tohunga of Te Whare Wananga o Te Rawheoro. This location still exists today and clear distinctions of the pa site can be recognised.

“Through this metaphor we investigate various mental and physical pathways of learning to attain matauranga maori,” said Kaaterina.

“We explore concepts of repository systems — Takuahiroa not only being a space for creative potential, but also being a space for storing knowledge.

“This space becomes a purpose for exhibition, our storehouse of knowledge, with the result of various research being our interpretation of the weaving together of concepts drawn from traditional knowledge and hapu narrative.”

Kaaterina’s new work combines properties of space, time and geometric figures to explore the concept of ‘The Whakairo of the Mind’, as discussed by Dr Wayne Ngata. Fusing traditional art and design foundations with modern design symbolism, Kaaterina works towards illuminating the ‘interpretation of a creative process’, the ‘conditioning of the mind to learn, to retain, to express, to create’.

“I want people to think beyond the tangible and look into the intangible creative.”

Tai’s new body of work is a progression from his previous series based around notions of identity. Under Takuahiroa, Tai looks to explore the human body as a vessel, to retain and pass on knowledge.

“Through our tipuna (ancestors), markers of DNA are passed down generations, markers that make us unique,” he said.

“Some of these genetic markers or groups of genes contribute to our physical make-up, for example, our height, body shape, skin colour, the colour of our eyes and hair. The genetic traits can also determine, or help recognise your talents, strengths and even weaknesses, to build on and develop.

“Traditional korero states that wananga were mainly for young men who were selected by their hapu and iwi to attend whare wananga. Some were selected based on their whakapapa, on their intellect, skill and perseverance of the skill or teachings.

“In some circumstances the men would be given various tests, or be set certain tasks to complete in aim to achieve permission or be selected.

“In other korero, tohunga would identify a child or children at an early age and watch over their learning, growth and development, to see if they had what was ‘required’ or ‘needed’ to attend whare wananga.”

A state of creative potential — Takuahiroa is Kaaterina and Tai’s metaphor for the legacy that has been handed down to them by their ancestors as artisans — a legacy that is designed through the weaving of the strands and seeds of creation.

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