Visual Voices exhibition opens

Art, Reo, Toi.

Art, Reo, Toi.

VISUAL LANGUAGES: Sue-ann Blandford, Amber Graham and Maiko Lewis-Whaanga with their artworks which feature in Visual Voices at Wananga o Aotearoa. The exhibition runs for one week from 10am-2pm and is free. Picture by Paul Rickard

An art exhibition showcasing the work of students in Rauangi — visual arts, Raranga — weaving and Whakairo — carving opened yesterday at Te Wananga o Aotearoa with a mix of the students’ artworks on display.

The exhibition opened with a charity auction, with all proceeds going to C Company Memorial House, Gizzy School Lunches and Hospice Tairawhiti.

Rauangi tutor Johnny Moetara said “the idea behind our art exhibition is a drive to strengthen the importance of not only the spoken word but our visual languages, whatever those offerings may be.”

Pictured here are three of the artists taking part in the exhibition, who are doing Level 4 in the Rauangi certificate (from left) Sue-ann Blandford, Amber Graham and Maiko Lewis-Whaanga.

Blandford’s work Sisterhood features figures entwined and united through sisterhood.

It is painted on raw canvas with threads hanging on sides with abstract lines.

Graham said her final exhibition artworks centre around the Maori motif Niho Taniwha, a symbol for protection.

This piece pictured is called Tapatoru (triangle) and is a mixed medium piece incorporating printmaking and sewing on fabriano paper.

“I love this geometric triangle pattern commonly used in tukutuku panels and in taniko weaving.

“To exist, the triangle demands three complementary elements: love, power and danger.”

Lewis-Whaanga calls her work Imaginal Cells and it features small origami butterflies and a golden circle.

It has a minimalist feel and the theme is “the beginning of positive change starts with you and the positive connections you make”, she says.

The group art exhibition called Visual Voices is described as:

ART — to capture our cultural diversity residing in the Toimatapu environment.

REO — to acknowledge our spoken language, to convey our stories, korero, whakapapa informed by cultural, political, environmental impacts captured in our constant visual and oratory histories.

TOI — Raranga, Rauangi, Whakairo. tauira kaupapa created interpretations via their selected media of choice, giving light to our exhibition title Visual Voices.

The exhibition will run for one week from 10am - 2pm and is free of charge.

An art exhibition showcasing the work of students in Rauangi — visual arts, Raranga — weaving and Whakairo — carving opened yesterday at Te Wananga o Aotearoa with a mix of the students’ artworks on display.

The exhibition opened with a charity auction, with all proceeds going to C Company Memorial House, Gizzy School Lunches and Hospice Tairawhiti.

Rauangi tutor Johnny Moetara said “the idea behind our art exhibition is a drive to strengthen the importance of not only the spoken word but our visual languages, whatever those offerings may be.”

Pictured here are three of the artists taking part in the exhibition, who are doing Level 4 in the Rauangi certificate (from left) Sue-ann Blandford, Amber Graham and Maiko Lewis-Whaanga.

Blandford’s work Sisterhood features figures entwined and united through sisterhood.

It is painted on raw canvas with threads hanging on sides with abstract lines.

Graham said her final exhibition artworks centre around the Maori motif Niho Taniwha, a symbol for protection.

This piece pictured is called Tapatoru (triangle) and is a mixed medium piece incorporating printmaking and sewing on fabriano paper.

“I love this geometric triangle pattern commonly used in tukutuku panels and in taniko weaving.

“To exist, the triangle demands three complementary elements: love, power and danger.”

Lewis-Whaanga calls her work Imaginal Cells and it features small origami butterflies and a golden circle.

It has a minimalist feel and the theme is “the beginning of positive change starts with you and the positive connections you make”, she says.

The group art exhibition called Visual Voices is described as:

ART — to capture our cultural diversity residing in the Toimatapu environment.

REO — to acknowledge our spoken language, to convey our stories, korero, whakapapa informed by cultural, political, environmental impacts captured in our constant visual and oratory histories.

TOI — Raranga, Rauangi, Whakairo. tauira kaupapa created interpretations via their selected media of choice, giving light to our exhibition title Visual Voices.

The exhibition will run for one week from 10am - 2pm and is free of charge.

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