In the air tonight

GET HIGHER: Fronted by Nikita Tu-Bryant (centre) and featuring Ed Zuccollo (left) and Rick Cranson, Flite promise to take you on a storytelling journey over groove and soundscapes, with their signature epic and expansive sound when they perform at the Dome next week. Picture by Wendy Collings

Mariana’s Trenchcoat. The title of an instrumental piece written by Ed Zuccollo of atmospheric psychedelic-pop funk act Flite plays on the name of the planet’s deepest point, the Mariana Trench. It’s so clever it prompts one of those I-wish-I’d-thought-of-that moments.

Zuccollo (also of Trinity Roots) likes to play with words, says the band’s folk-soul storytelling, guitarist, Nikita Tu-Bryant.

“Ed and I were in a long-term relationship for three-and-a-half years. While we were together he gave me the beats then while we were breaking up I wrote lyrics for the song about the break up.”

Tu-Bryant doesn’t muck around with small talk. She goes deep — so the song title is a perfect fit.

“I wrote a line of poetry every day during the break up. It was a pretty amicable break up after a long time together but it was still difficult.”

The former couple still played together in the band — “so it was a little tense for a while”.

This is why, after Flite’s debut with Mariana’s Trenchcoat, the band went into hibernation for four years. Then late last year they climbed out of the trough with a new single, Try to Find a Way. Now the band made up of Tu-Bryant (Nikita the Spooky and a Circus of Men); the thick, lush sounds of Zuccollo’s Moog synth bass and Rhodes, and the filthy drive and psychedelic tribal drums of Rick Cranson (Little Bushman) is coming to Gisborne. Tu-Bryant writes about 90 percent of Flite’s songs. Among the playlist is Try To Find a Way which Tu-Bryant co-wrote with Zuccollo and Cranson.

“It’s another Ed split up song, one of our favourites. After a show one time a fan talked about Try To Find a Way and said ‘it made me move, it made me optimistic and made me question life’. Lyrically, I think deeply a lot of the time to make the songs a bit deeper even though our music is feelgood.”

Now about that Moog . . . who plays a Moog? Didn’t the old school analog synth fade away along with the Mellotron in the 1970s?

“Ed is fantastic at playing it,” says Tu-Bryant.

“The mini-Moog has all the knobs and filters. The sound suits Flite because Ed really does take us to space with it. It has a deep bass sound that makes you want to move and it has the ability to travel and become a solo instrument.

“Someone said our music makes you feel stuff. It makes you move and it’s thought-provoking.”

Flite, Dome room, April 27, 8pm. $20 presales from The Aviary, www.undertheradar.co.nz or $25 at the door.

Mariana’s Trenchcoat. The title of an instrumental piece written by Ed Zuccollo of atmospheric psychedelic-pop funk act Flite plays on the name of the planet’s deepest point, the Mariana Trench. It’s so clever it prompts one of those I-wish-I’d-thought-of-that moments.

Zuccollo (also of Trinity Roots) likes to play with words, says the band’s folk-soul storytelling, guitarist, Nikita Tu-Bryant.

“Ed and I were in a long-term relationship for three-and-a-half years. While we were together he gave me the beats then while we were breaking up I wrote lyrics for the song about the break up.”

Tu-Bryant doesn’t muck around with small talk. She goes deep — so the song title is a perfect fit.

“I wrote a line of poetry every day during the break up. It was a pretty amicable break up after a long time together but it was still difficult.”

The former couple still played together in the band — “so it was a little tense for a while”.

This is why, after Flite’s debut with Mariana’s Trenchcoat, the band went into hibernation for four years. Then late last year they climbed out of the trough with a new single, Try to Find a Way. Now the band made up of Tu-Bryant (Nikita the Spooky and a Circus of Men); the thick, lush sounds of Zuccollo’s Moog synth bass and Rhodes, and the filthy drive and psychedelic tribal drums of Rick Cranson (Little Bushman) is coming to Gisborne. Tu-Bryant writes about 90 percent of Flite’s songs. Among the playlist is Try To Find a Way which Tu-Bryant co-wrote with Zuccollo and Cranson.

“It’s another Ed split up song, one of our favourites. After a show one time a fan talked about Try To Find a Way and said ‘it made me move, it made me optimistic and made me question life’. Lyrically, I think deeply a lot of the time to make the songs a bit deeper even though our music is feelgood.”

Now about that Moog . . . who plays a Moog? Didn’t the old school analog synth fade away along with the Mellotron in the 1970s?

“Ed is fantastic at playing it,” says Tu-Bryant.

“The mini-Moog has all the knobs and filters. The sound suits Flite because Ed really does take us to space with it. It has a deep bass sound that makes you want to move and it has the ability to travel and become a solo instrument.

“Someone said our music makes you feel stuff. It makes you move and it’s thought-provoking.”

Flite, Dome room, April 27, 8pm. $20 presales from The Aviary, www.undertheradar.co.nz or $25 at the door.

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