The day the sun stood still

THEY’VE GOT AN AWFUL LOT OF MUSIC IN BRAZIL: Pao de Acucar (Sugar Loaf Mountain) photo-bombs Brazilbeat Sound System musicians Nego Beto (left) and Mara Weiss’s selfie. The duo and guests’ perform tomorrow night at Smash Palace. Picture supplied

The moment the South Pole is aimed furthest away from the sun on the 23.5 degree tilt of the Earth’s axis party animals will cut loose in the industrial subdivision. The shortest day of the year will be marked — possibly permanently scarred — by the pulsating beats of Brazilbeat Sound System (BBSS) and a toasty fire at Smash Palace. For tomorrow night’s winter solstice gig people are encouraged to dress up as animals to help free their wild side as they lose themselves to dance at the midwinter celebration.

The evening signifies the winter solstice but Brazilian percussionist Nego Beto and DJ Mara Weiss’s BBSS evolved from warmer climes.

“Formed in San Francisco California in 2001 . . . BBSS are known for fiery performances, thunderous beats and live percussion,” says an online music magazine.

“The BBSS sound is a mash up of funk, house, breaks, dub, roots and drum ‘n’ bass. Tight percussive arrangements complete the picture.”

The act’s name has its roots in the monthly column Beto and Weiss began writing for Beat Magazine in the mid-1990s. Called Brazil Beat the column covered the newest trends in Brazilian music. Musicians and record labels sent in cassette tapes and CDs for review. The couple then started a sound system project to showcase this material and played the music at various gigs.

Sound system culture also had its origins in tropical conditions. From the 1940s Kingston DJs loaded up their trucks with a generator, turntables, and huge speakers and set up street parties.

“The sound system is an integral part of Jamaican music,” says Weiss.

“The model has spread throughout the world. Our group hearkens back to that culture. We push the boundaries of that because we play all styles — reggae, dub, underground, house and hip-hop.”

The duo record new songs, update the beats and follow the new generation of sound, says Beto. They also have a home studio where they create their own sounds and remix tracks they like, says Weiss.

“We put out songs all the time. We stay relevant and play at different types of gigs, from festivals to school balls and private functions.”

A longstanding association with the Rhythm and Vines music festival has seen them play at all but one R&V over the 16 years.

BBSS will now feature on a new online music channel, Music for The People. The platform brings together artists, DJs, labels and musical taste-makers in the New Zealand and world electronic, urban and indie music scenes.

“We’ve been invited to do a regular Sunday afternoon set starting in July,” says Weiss.

“It’s going all over the world.”

Back from Samoa, DJose will also perform at Smash’s solstice night as will MC Dreadeye, and Dizfunk.

“The idea is to bring people together for the fastest day of winter so people don’t feel depressed,” says Beto.

“Friday will be an awesome party. We like to make people happy.”

For tunes and music videos of BBSS’s signature mix of Brazilian roots rhythms and thunderous beats visit www.brazilbeatsoundsystem.com.

Brazilbeat Sound System, along with MC Dreadeye, Dizfunk and DJose present the Winter Solstice Party at Smash Palace, tomorrow at 9pm. $5 on the door.

The moment the South Pole is aimed furthest away from the sun on the 23.5 degree tilt of the Earth’s axis party animals will cut loose in the industrial subdivision. The shortest day of the year will be marked — possibly permanently scarred — by the pulsating beats of Brazilbeat Sound System (BBSS) and a toasty fire at Smash Palace. For tomorrow night’s winter solstice gig people are encouraged to dress up as animals to help free their wild side as they lose themselves to dance at the midwinter celebration.

The evening signifies the winter solstice but Brazilian percussionist Nego Beto and DJ Mara Weiss’s BBSS evolved from warmer climes.

“Formed in San Francisco California in 2001 . . . BBSS are known for fiery performances, thunderous beats and live percussion,” says an online music magazine.

“The BBSS sound is a mash up of funk, house, breaks, dub, roots and drum ‘n’ bass. Tight percussive arrangements complete the picture.”

The act’s name has its roots in the monthly column Beto and Weiss began writing for Beat Magazine in the mid-1990s. Called Brazil Beat the column covered the newest trends in Brazilian music. Musicians and record labels sent in cassette tapes and CDs for review. The couple then started a sound system project to showcase this material and played the music at various gigs.

Sound system culture also had its origins in tropical conditions. From the 1940s Kingston DJs loaded up their trucks with a generator, turntables, and huge speakers and set up street parties.

“The sound system is an integral part of Jamaican music,” says Weiss.

“The model has spread throughout the world. Our group hearkens back to that culture. We push the boundaries of that because we play all styles — reggae, dub, underground, house and hip-hop.”

The duo record new songs, update the beats and follow the new generation of sound, says Beto. They also have a home studio where they create their own sounds and remix tracks they like, says Weiss.

“We put out songs all the time. We stay relevant and play at different types of gigs, from festivals to school balls and private functions.”

A longstanding association with the Rhythm and Vines music festival has seen them play at all but one R&V over the 16 years.

BBSS will now feature on a new online music channel, Music for The People. The platform brings together artists, DJs, labels and musical taste-makers in the New Zealand and world electronic, urban and indie music scenes.

“We’ve been invited to do a regular Sunday afternoon set starting in July,” says Weiss.

“It’s going all over the world.”

Back from Samoa, DJose will also perform at Smash’s solstice night as will MC Dreadeye, and Dizfunk.

“The idea is to bring people together for the fastest day of winter so people don’t feel depressed,” says Beto.

“Friday will be an awesome party. We like to make people happy.”

For tunes and music videos of BBSS’s signature mix of Brazilian roots rhythms and thunderous beats visit www.brazilbeatsoundsystem.com.

Brazilbeat Sound System, along with MC Dreadeye, Dizfunk and DJose present the Winter Solstice Party at Smash Palace, tomorrow at 9pm. $5 on the door.

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