By the way, which one is Pink?

Revival to present Pink Floyd tribute act at Smash Palace.

Revival to present Pink Floyd tribute act at Smash Palace.

COMFORTABLY NUMB: Hawke’s Bay band Revival present their full noise, three hour Pink Floyd tribute act Comfortably Numb with big visuals, state of the art light show and blistering guitar solos at Smash Palace next week. Picture supplied

No such tattoos are required when Revival brings their show Comfortably Numb to Smash Palace next week — but dedication has gone to the next level for some Floyd fans in drummer Layton Gemmell’s hometown.

“We have a family in Wairoa whose mum, dad, daughters and son all have the Pink Floyd tattoo,” he says.

Revival also take their tribute to the psychedelic, progressive band seriously but the band saves that devotion for their performance and staging.

The band’s members have variously performed with international acts that include Ronan Keating, Leo Sayer and Billy Ocean but when they came together as covers band Revival they raised the bar with sound, lighting and staging, says Gemmell.

Pink Floyd was one band Revival’s guitarist/singer Cougan Renata was keen to pay tribute to in live performance.

“There’s quite a Pink Floyd fan base out there,” says Gemmell of fans of the out-there band.

“It’s a specialised interest because it’s generally not a dancey sound. Some people do dance to songs like Money, and Brain Damage but mostly it’s about engaging with the creativeness in Pink Floyd’s music.”

Although the band is known for what was once loosely known as space rock — a genre described as characterised by lengthy song structures centred on instrumental textures — Pink Floyd is just as famous for it’s stupendous lighting and often surreal staging effects. Revival brings some of that to its own shows and can tailor its choreographed lighting, laser, strobe, projections and smoke machines to the performance space.

“When we point the laser tunnel at the crowd people go into the next dimension,” says Gemmell.

“You can only imagine what it’s like at an actual Pink Floyd concert. That’s the feel we want.”

For the first half of their show Revival performs songs from Pink Floyd’s 1979 album The Wall, a rock opera centred on Pink, a character drug-addled and depressed by the music industry. He ultimately tears down the wall that metaphorically isolated him from society.

“It’s an intense opening to the concert,” says Gemmell.

“Most Pink Floyd concerts open with other songs but we do it differently.”

Revival’s Pink Floyd playlist includes songs from the English band’s back catalogue through to more recent tracks.

“We try to mix it up as much as we can. Everyone enjoys playing the songs. Musically speaking the creativity is dynamic,” says Gemmell.

“Arrangements are key. It’s so simple but so powerful. Pink Floyd were way ahead of their time.”

Maybe A Brief History of Time author, the late Stephen Hawking saw them coming. As in the Floyd’s last album Endless River the theoretical physicist and cosmologist has a talk-on part on the tribute band’s show.

Revival’s tour has “brought all the Floydeans out of the woodwork”, says Gemmell.

They include the tattooed and the non-tattooed, baby boomers and younger generations exposed at an early age to their parents’ records.

“From the moment we step on stage we deliver,” says Gemmell.

“We want to revive everyone. We want to revive ourselves and people when we play.”

  • Pink Floyd tribute band Revival, Smash Palace, Friday, August 23, 8.30pm. Tickets $25 + bf www.eventfinda.co.nz, door sales $30.

No such tattoos are required when Revival brings their show Comfortably Numb to Smash Palace next week — but dedication has gone to the next level for some Floyd fans in drummer Layton Gemmell’s hometown.

“We have a family in Wairoa whose mum, dad, daughters and son all have the Pink Floyd tattoo,” he says.

Revival also take their tribute to the psychedelic, progressive band seriously but the band saves that devotion for their performance and staging.

The band’s members have variously performed with international acts that include Ronan Keating, Leo Sayer and Billy Ocean but when they came together as covers band Revival they raised the bar with sound, lighting and staging, says Gemmell.

Pink Floyd was one band Revival’s guitarist/singer Cougan Renata was keen to pay tribute to in live performance.

“There’s quite a Pink Floyd fan base out there,” says Gemmell of fans of the out-there band.

“It’s a specialised interest because it’s generally not a dancey sound. Some people do dance to songs like Money, and Brain Damage but mostly it’s about engaging with the creativeness in Pink Floyd’s music.”

Although the band is known for what was once loosely known as space rock — a genre described as characterised by lengthy song structures centred on instrumental textures — Pink Floyd is just as famous for it’s stupendous lighting and often surreal staging effects. Revival brings some of that to its own shows and can tailor its choreographed lighting, laser, strobe, projections and smoke machines to the performance space.

“When we point the laser tunnel at the crowd people go into the next dimension,” says Gemmell.

“You can only imagine what it’s like at an actual Pink Floyd concert. That’s the feel we want.”

For the first half of their show Revival performs songs from Pink Floyd’s 1979 album The Wall, a rock opera centred on Pink, a character drug-addled and depressed by the music industry. He ultimately tears down the wall that metaphorically isolated him from society.

“It’s an intense opening to the concert,” says Gemmell.

“Most Pink Floyd concerts open with other songs but we do it differently.”

Revival’s Pink Floyd playlist includes songs from the English band’s back catalogue through to more recent tracks.

“We try to mix it up as much as we can. Everyone enjoys playing the songs. Musically speaking the creativity is dynamic,” says Gemmell.

“Arrangements are key. It’s so simple but so powerful. Pink Floyd were way ahead of their time.”

Maybe A Brief History of Time author, the late Stephen Hawking saw them coming. As in the Floyd’s last album Endless River the theoretical physicist and cosmologist has a talk-on part on the tribute band’s show.

Revival’s tour has “brought all the Floydeans out of the woodwork”, says Gemmell.

They include the tattooed and the non-tattooed, baby boomers and younger generations exposed at an early age to their parents’ records.

“From the moment we step on stage we deliver,” says Gemmell.

“We want to revive everyone. We want to revive ourselves and people when we play.”

  • Pink Floyd tribute band Revival, Smash Palace, Friday, August 23, 8.30pm. Tickets $25 + bf www.eventfinda.co.nz, door sales $30.
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