Advanced compost workshop a first

Tairawhiti Environment Centre holding its advanced composting workshop this Saturday.

Tairawhiti Environment Centre holding its advanced composting workshop this Saturday.

IF YOU are thinking about doing a big garden clean-up soon you might want to head down to the Tairawhiti Environment Centre this Saturday for an advanced composting workshop.

Composting is a cost-effective way to get rid of garden waste, and to produce “food” for your garden at the same time, says workshop co-ordinator James Peterson.

“It is a win-win,” he says.

Rather than smaller composting systems designed for everyday household organic waste, this particular workshop will focus on composting large amounts of organic garden waste in one go.

People interested might be those looking at doing a big garden clean-up this autumn, or simply people with large sections that produce a lot of organic waste, says Mr Peterson.

Participants will learn how to build a compost system correctly using simple materials like wood pellets, and how to layer and water the compost.

The compost could be ready in as little as four months, and composting is becoming increasingly popular in Gisborne says Mr Peterson.

“As the price of getting rid of green waste increases more people are looking at composting instead.”

Composting occurs in natural environments, such as the bush, as organic matter breaks down, yet it is also possible to recreate the process in an urban setting using food and yard waste."

Done correctly, compost will provide plants with important minerals and nutrients. It is especially important in Gisborne, where the sandy, loamy and heavy clay soils lack much organic matter.

Composting also reduces landfill waste and greenhouse gas emissions. The Tairawhiti Environment Centre says compostable materials make up approximately 30 percent of the material going to landfills.

When organic matter sits in landfills it decomposes in an anaerobic, rather than aerobic, manner, producing methane gas, one of the most damaging greenhouse gases.

The workshops have been run since 2012 throughout the region, beginning in rural areas before shifting into town, but this is the first advanced workshop.









IF YOU are thinking about doing a big garden clean-up soon you might want to head down to the Tairawhiti Environment Centre this Saturday for an advanced composting workshop.

Composting is a cost-effective way to get rid of garden waste, and to produce “food” for your garden at the same time, says workshop co-ordinator James Peterson.

“It is a win-win,” he says.

Rather than smaller composting systems designed for everyday household organic waste, this particular workshop will focus on composting large amounts of organic garden waste in one go.

People interested might be those looking at doing a big garden clean-up this autumn, or simply people with large sections that produce a lot of organic waste, says Mr Peterson.

Participants will learn how to build a compost system correctly using simple materials like wood pellets, and how to layer and water the compost.

The compost could be ready in as little as four months, and composting is becoming increasingly popular in Gisborne says Mr Peterson.

“As the price of getting rid of green waste increases more people are looking at composting instead.”

Composting occurs in natural environments, such as the bush, as organic matter breaks down, yet it is also possible to recreate the process in an urban setting using food and yard waste."

Done correctly, compost will provide plants with important minerals and nutrients. It is especially important in Gisborne, where the sandy, loamy and heavy clay soils lack much organic matter.

Composting also reduces landfill waste and greenhouse gas emissions. The Tairawhiti Environment Centre says compostable materials make up approximately 30 percent of the material going to landfills.

When organic matter sits in landfills it decomposes in an anaerobic, rather than aerobic, manner, producing methane gas, one of the most damaging greenhouse gases.

The workshops have been run since 2012 throughout the region, beginning in rural areas before shifting into town, but this is the first advanced workshop.









The workshop takes place at the Tairawhiti Environment Centre this Saturday, May 7, from 11.30am to 12.30pm.

• For bookings phone: 867 4708, or email: tairawhitienvcentre@gmail.com

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