Restriction renewed on Te Arai water use

Worsening dry conditions keep irrigators in catchment on water restrictions.

Worsening dry conditions keep irrigators in catchment on water restrictions.

Hot and windy weather means land is dry. These paddocks are at Maraekakaho. 9 January 2017 Hawke's Bay Today photograph by Warren Buckland.

HBG 10Jan17 -

GISBORNE District Council yesterday renewed a water shortage direction for the Te Arai River catchment while irrigators in the catchment remain on water restrictions because of the worsening dry conditions.

The council drought committee met yesterday and expressed concern at no significant rain forecast over the next 10 days.

“The Niwa drought index shows Gisborne City and the Poverty Bay Flats as severely dry,” said shared services science manager Lois Easton.

“River levels in the Waipaoa River are also dropping significantly and if river levels continue to fall then it is likely that some irrigators will have to cease watering altogether.”

A careful watch was being kept on weather and climate forecasts and further water restrictions in the city may be required.

“All water users are asked to use water carefully and efficiently and avoid wastage. The council will operate the Waipaoa treatment plant again in order to save water in the Mangapoike dams, as the main processing season has not yet started.

“Domestic and city users of Te Hapara Sands bore water are also asked to follow the same water restrictions as those applying to water users on the city supply.”

The city is under a level one water restriction, which means garden sprinklers can only be used from 6am to 8am.

“The Te Hapara Sands aquifer was fully allocated to water permit holders,” Ms Easton said. “It is also under pressure in this dry period.”

GISBORNE District Council yesterday renewed a water shortage direction for the Te Arai River catchment while irrigators in the catchment remain on water restrictions because of the worsening dry conditions.

The council drought committee met yesterday and expressed concern at no significant rain forecast over the next 10 days.

“The Niwa drought index shows Gisborne City and the Poverty Bay Flats as severely dry,” said shared services science manager Lois Easton.

“River levels in the Waipaoa River are also dropping significantly and if river levels continue to fall then it is likely that some irrigators will have to cease watering altogether.”

A careful watch was being kept on weather and climate forecasts and further water restrictions in the city may be required.

“All water users are asked to use water carefully and efficiently and avoid wastage. The council will operate the Waipaoa treatment plant again in order to save water in the Mangapoike dams, as the main processing season has not yet started.

“Domestic and city users of Te Hapara Sands bore water are also asked to follow the same water restrictions as those applying to water users on the city supply.”

The city is under a level one water restriction, which means garden sprinklers can only be used from 6am to 8am.

“The Te Hapara Sands aquifer was fully allocated to water permit holders,” Ms Easton said. “It is also under pressure in this dry period.”

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