Restoration of Te Wherowhero lagoon

Planting starts on Saturday.

Planting starts on Saturday.

TIME TO GET PLANTING: Gisborne Boys’ High School students Vinson Parata (left) and Sam Godwin-Moa (right), and Department of Conservation East Coast district community ranger Trudi Ngawhare, help prepare an area by Te Wherowhero lagoon for winter planting. The first public planting session is on Saturday. Picture by Liam Clayton

THE COMMUNITY is invited to a series of native planting sessions from this Saturday, as part of a project to restore Te Wherowhero lagoon.

The project began about 10 years ago with planting and fencing work at the Muriwai end of the lagoon, then spread as landowners got on board, giving up little tracts of land and fencing them off.

This winter volunteers will plant the last part of the estuary to be fenced off from stock.

Tairawhiti Environment Centre co-ordinator Jamie Foxley said it was a unique opportunity to visit one of the most scenic areas of the lagoon.

“This part of the lagoon is accessed only by private farm, so it is a good chance to see the lagoon from there.

“There is a good view of Te Kuri a Paoa/Young Nick’s Head and plenty of native plantings and wildlife.”

Due to the tidal changes, they get a large variety of birds, including spoonbill and kotuku (white heron).

This year volunteers will plant about 2500 native plants over five public sessions.

Casualties from dry summer

A lot of plants planted last winter died as a result of the dry summer.

“It is quite a harsh environment here, especially with the salt water,” he said.

“We have changed some of our species to hardier types, including more harakeke (flaxes).”

However, with a good amount of rain this autumn, Mr Foxley is hopeful the new plants will fare better.

Mr Foxley and some other volunteers, including a large group from Gisborne Boy’s High School, have been preparing the lagoon for planting over the past few weeks, including weeding and removing fibreglass stakes from areas planted in the past few years.

Volunteers will replant in some of those spots, as well as the new areas.

This Saturday’s planting session is from 10am. Bring gumboots, suitable clothing and lunch. Tools are provided.

Access to the spot is on a sweeping corner, 2.5 kilometres south of Browns Beach Road, Muriwai. Look out for signposts from SH2 Muriwai (main road south).

Contact Jamie Foxley on 022 627 1952 for more information.

THE COMMUNITY is invited to a series of native planting sessions from this Saturday, as part of a project to restore Te Wherowhero lagoon.

The project began about 10 years ago with planting and fencing work at the Muriwai end of the lagoon, then spread as landowners got on board, giving up little tracts of land and fencing them off.

This winter volunteers will plant the last part of the estuary to be fenced off from stock.

Tairawhiti Environment Centre co-ordinator Jamie Foxley said it was a unique opportunity to visit one of the most scenic areas of the lagoon.

“This part of the lagoon is accessed only by private farm, so it is a good chance to see the lagoon from there.

“There is a good view of Te Kuri a Paoa/Young Nick’s Head and plenty of native plantings and wildlife.”

Due to the tidal changes, they get a large variety of birds, including spoonbill and kotuku (white heron).

This year volunteers will plant about 2500 native plants over five public sessions.

Casualties from dry summer

A lot of plants planted last winter died as a result of the dry summer.

“It is quite a harsh environment here, especially with the salt water,” he said.

“We have changed some of our species to hardier types, including more harakeke (flaxes).”

However, with a good amount of rain this autumn, Mr Foxley is hopeful the new plants will fare better.

Mr Foxley and some other volunteers, including a large group from Gisborne Boy’s High School, have been preparing the lagoon for planting over the past few weeks, including weeding and removing fibreglass stakes from areas planted in the past few years.

Volunteers will replant in some of those spots, as well as the new areas.

This Saturday’s planting session is from 10am. Bring gumboots, suitable clothing and lunch. Tools are provided.

Access to the spot is on a sweeping corner, 2.5 kilometres south of Browns Beach Road, Muriwai. Look out for signposts from SH2 Muriwai (main road south).

Contact Jamie Foxley on 022 627 1952 for more information.

Public planting sessions will also be held on Wednesday, June 28 ( from 10am), Sunday, July 2 (10am), Wednesday, July 12 (10am) and Sunday, July 23 (12 noon).

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