Great effort at the Waikanae stream

And it beat the rain

And it beat the rain

CLEAN-UP: Jason, Catherine, Nevaeh and Kian Raabe came down to help out at the clean-up at the Waikanae Stream. Picture supplied

IT WAS a case of weeds out, plants in and litter bagged or stacked in piles for collection, at the Waikanae Stream working bee on Sunday.

Twenty volunteers picked up rubbish, cleared weeds and fallen branches, and planted 200 native shrubs including flaxes, cabbage trees and ribbonwoods.

Organising team member Jill Hudson said it was a pleasant surprise to see how little rubbish there was in the area, following a site visit in June when there was a disappointing amount of litter along the banks of the stream.

“On Sunday we worked next to the Grey Street skate park, an area damaged by Easter storms. Willows were blown into the stream and between that damage and unavoidable plant losses when Gisborne District Council contractors removed trunks and tree branches, the area was in need of a tidy-up,” Mrs Hudson said.

The skate park plantings have been maintained as a Bunnings ‘adopt-a-spot’ and a team from the firm provided supplies and joined in with other volunteers weeding and planting on Sunday.

Waikanae Stream work is part of a long term project to improve the health of the waterway by clearing litter and planting native shrubs to filter run-off from surrounding areas.

“We were lucky with the weather and got a good number of shrubs in the ground to fill gaps and extend the planted area before the rain started.

“It’s great to see people of all ages at these working bees and there is always something they can do, whether it is picking up litter, pulling out weeds or planting shrubs.

“It’s also great that we often attract people in the park who come over to check us out, then get stuck in helping out.

“It all bodes well for the future of Waikanae Stream.”

Waikanae Stream supporters include the Department of Conservation, Women’s Native Tree Project Trust, Gisborne District Council, Keep Gisborne Beautiful, Tairawhiti Environment Centre, Forest and Bird Gisborne Branch, Eastland Port and Jukes Carriers.

IT WAS a case of weeds out, plants in and litter bagged or stacked in piles for collection, at the Waikanae Stream working bee on Sunday.

Twenty volunteers picked up rubbish, cleared weeds and fallen branches, and planted 200 native shrubs including flaxes, cabbage trees and ribbonwoods.

Organising team member Jill Hudson said it was a pleasant surprise to see how little rubbish there was in the area, following a site visit in June when there was a disappointing amount of litter along the banks of the stream.

“On Sunday we worked next to the Grey Street skate park, an area damaged by Easter storms. Willows were blown into the stream and between that damage and unavoidable plant losses when Gisborne District Council contractors removed trunks and tree branches, the area was in need of a tidy-up,” Mrs Hudson said.

The skate park plantings have been maintained as a Bunnings ‘adopt-a-spot’ and a team from the firm provided supplies and joined in with other volunteers weeding and planting on Sunday.

Waikanae Stream work is part of a long term project to improve the health of the waterway by clearing litter and planting native shrubs to filter run-off from surrounding areas.

“We were lucky with the weather and got a good number of shrubs in the ground to fill gaps and extend the planted area before the rain started.

“It’s great to see people of all ages at these working bees and there is always something they can do, whether it is picking up litter, pulling out weeds or planting shrubs.

“It’s also great that we often attract people in the park who come over to check us out, then get stuck in helping out.

“It all bodes well for the future of Waikanae Stream.”

Waikanae Stream supporters include the Department of Conservation, Women’s Native Tree Project Trust, Gisborne District Council, Keep Gisborne Beautiful, Tairawhiti Environment Centre, Forest and Bird Gisborne Branch, Eastland Port and Jukes Carriers.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Should consultation on Gisborne city wastewater treatment and disposal include a “do nothing” option as suggested by the Mayor on Thursday, as well as the five options priced at estimated capital costs of $23.5 million to $42.1m which were approved by councillors?