DoC urges community action for Conservation Week

PLANT CARE: As part of Conservation Week there will be a plant-care activity at Titirangi/Kaiti Hill. Pictured are DoC ranger Joe Waikari and Tangaroa Moa-Ratapu of Te Kura Kaupapa Maori o Horouta Wananga taking part in a previous planting session on Titirangi. File picture by Liam Clayton

THE Department of Conservation is calling on New Zealanders to convert their love of nature into action this Conservation Week.

Tairawhiti environmental groups and experts are coming together for Conservation Week 2017, from October 14-22, to show people that conservation can be done in their own backyard.

“We know 85 percent of New Zealanders rate conservation as important to them personally, yet still only about one in 10 have actively helped on a conservation project,” DoC community ranger Malcolm Smith said, citing the Survey of New Zealanders 2016.

“Our predator-free vision of ridding the country of rats, stoats and possums by 2050 starts in your own backyard.

“It is great to see momentum gathering as more communities band together to make their own areas predator-free.

“Even small actions make a big difference.”

The Whangawehi Management Catchment Group, of which DoC is a part, is bringing together conservation experts and holding a free predator control workshop at Mahia on October 17.

“This workshop will focus on the ‘how’ and is going to be very practical,” Mr Smith said.

Several trapping experts will be at the workshop to share their knowledge, including DoC national predator control officer Darren Peters, who has been involved at the cutting edge of predator control for many years; Rod Dickson, who has been at the forefront of the Cape-to-City predator control project in Hawke’s Bay; and Gisborne’s Sam Gibson, a technical adviser for Goodnature humane self-resetting traps.

Also during Conservation Week will be a plant care activity at Titirangi/Kaiti Hill on October 18.

“Getting out and taking care of our nature also has the added benefit of improving health and wellbeing, so it’s win-win,” Mr Smith said.

As part of Conservation Week, DoC partner Genesis is encouraging children to take part in a national competition with its Whio Boot Camp online game.

The game teaches players how a whio (blue duck) lives in the wild, eating, running rapids and avoiding predators.

The Toyota Kiwi Guardians programme, which connects children with nature and rewards them with medals, is launching a new waterways clean-up medal, Toa Tiaki Wai.

  • The predator control workshop runs from 9.30am to 3pm on October 17 and is free to attend. You need to register by October 15, by emailing Malcolm Smith at mhsmith@doc.govt.nz or phone 0274998527.
  • The plant care activity at Titirangi is happening on October 18 from 10am-12pm. Participants need to bring covered footwear and outside clothes. Tools provided. Meet at top carpark, opposite the Telecom towers. For further information contact Andy Kinsella at Gisborne District Council on 0275118156.
  • For further details about Conservation Week and to register for events, visit www.conservationweek.org.nz

THE Department of Conservation is calling on New Zealanders to convert their love of nature into action this Conservation Week.

Tairawhiti environmental groups and experts are coming together for Conservation Week 2017, from October 14-22, to show people that conservation can be done in their own backyard.

“We know 85 percent of New Zealanders rate conservation as important to them personally, yet still only about one in 10 have actively helped on a conservation project,” DoC community ranger Malcolm Smith said, citing the Survey of New Zealanders 2016.

“Our predator-free vision of ridding the country of rats, stoats and possums by 2050 starts in your own backyard.

“It is great to see momentum gathering as more communities band together to make their own areas predator-free.

“Even small actions make a big difference.”

The Whangawehi Management Catchment Group, of which DoC is a part, is bringing together conservation experts and holding a free predator control workshop at Mahia on October 17.

“This workshop will focus on the ‘how’ and is going to be very practical,” Mr Smith said.

Several trapping experts will be at the workshop to share their knowledge, including DoC national predator control officer Darren Peters, who has been involved at the cutting edge of predator control for many years; Rod Dickson, who has been at the forefront of the Cape-to-City predator control project in Hawke’s Bay; and Gisborne’s Sam Gibson, a technical adviser for Goodnature humane self-resetting traps.

Also during Conservation Week will be a plant care activity at Titirangi/Kaiti Hill on October 18.

“Getting out and taking care of our nature also has the added benefit of improving health and wellbeing, so it’s win-win,” Mr Smith said.

As part of Conservation Week, DoC partner Genesis is encouraging children to take part in a national competition with its Whio Boot Camp online game.

The game teaches players how a whio (blue duck) lives in the wild, eating, running rapids and avoiding predators.

The Toyota Kiwi Guardians programme, which connects children with nature and rewards them with medals, is launching a new waterways clean-up medal, Toa Tiaki Wai.

  • The predator control workshop runs from 9.30am to 3pm on October 17 and is free to attend. You need to register by October 15, by emailing Malcolm Smith at mhsmith@doc.govt.nz or phone 0274998527.
  • The plant care activity at Titirangi is happening on October 18 from 10am-12pm. Participants need to bring covered footwear and outside clothes. Tools provided. Meet at top carpark, opposite the Telecom towers. For further information contact Andy Kinsella at Gisborne District Council on 0275118156.
  • For further details about Conservation Week and to register for events, visit www.conservationweek.org.nz
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