Volunteer plantings link along Waikanae Stream

WAIKANAE STREAM SPRING CLEAN: From left, volunteers Maila Tawera, Kauri Forno, Jane Luiten, Bredna Overend, John Hudson, Barbara Callender, Kay Barlow and Clarice Alderdice pause for a picture before getting back to weeding and planting. Picture supplied

THIRTY volunteers spent two hours collecting litter, weeding, planting and spreading mulch at Waikanae Stream on Sunday afternoon.

The results were a collection of five bags of rubbish, one bag of recycling and 110 native plants including flaxes, cabbage trees, hebes and ribbonwoods planted in a weed-free, mulched shrubbery that now stretches the length of the Grey Street Skatepark.

Organising team member Jason Akuhata-Brown said it was great seeing how well the older plants were growing and how far the planting is extending along the bank.

“All the plants for Sunday were supplied by the Gisborne District Council, and over the last two years they have really pushed the planting programme along," he said.

"Plantings at various sites are finally being linked up along the bank of the awa (river).

"The section between Customhouse and Grey streets has planting all along the northern bank of the stream so it just needs a few gaps to be filled and ongoing maintenance until the native plants grow big enough to shade out weeds."

Mr Akuhata-Brown said long-term supporters of the project have allowed small groups of volunteers to make steady progress since 2011. For Sunday’s effort, in addition to plants from the council, Eastland Port supplied five cubic metres of bark to use as a weed-suppressing mulch.

The Department of Conservation and Tairawhiti Environment Centre provided tools and publicity. Keep Gisborne Beautiful supplied gloves, bags and hand-sanitiser, and the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust team turned up in force to weed and plant.

A disappointing part of the day was finding two full rubbish bags and an old microwave oven left under trees on the south side of the stream, Mr Akuhata-Brown said.

All waste collected was disposed of by Jukes Carriers.

Te Ora Hou, who manage the Skatepark, donated soft drinks and the Skatepark contributed extra workers in the form of young skaters who were intrigued by the project and happy to help spread bark around plants and collect rubbish.

“We didn’t have the usual family groups, but rangatahi from the Skatepark certainly got into the mahi," Mr Akuhata-Brown said.

"This project has always been about a wide range of people helping out with donations and work whenever they can. With the help of our supporters and volunteers, we expect to keep going until the awa no longer needs our help.”

THIRTY volunteers spent two hours collecting litter, weeding, planting and spreading mulch at Waikanae Stream on Sunday afternoon.

The results were a collection of five bags of rubbish, one bag of recycling and 110 native plants including flaxes, cabbage trees, hebes and ribbonwoods planted in a weed-free, mulched shrubbery that now stretches the length of the Grey Street Skatepark.

Organising team member Jason Akuhata-Brown said it was great seeing how well the older plants were growing and how far the planting is extending along the bank.

“All the plants for Sunday were supplied by the Gisborne District Council, and over the last two years they have really pushed the planting programme along," he said.

"Plantings at various sites are finally being linked up along the bank of the awa (river).

"The section between Customhouse and Grey streets has planting all along the northern bank of the stream so it just needs a few gaps to be filled and ongoing maintenance until the native plants grow big enough to shade out weeds."

Mr Akuhata-Brown said long-term supporters of the project have allowed small groups of volunteers to make steady progress since 2011. For Sunday’s effort, in addition to plants from the council, Eastland Port supplied five cubic metres of bark to use as a weed-suppressing mulch.

The Department of Conservation and Tairawhiti Environment Centre provided tools and publicity. Keep Gisborne Beautiful supplied gloves, bags and hand-sanitiser, and the Women’s Native Tree Project Trust team turned up in force to weed and plant.

A disappointing part of the day was finding two full rubbish bags and an old microwave oven left under trees on the south side of the stream, Mr Akuhata-Brown said.

All waste collected was disposed of by Jukes Carriers.

Te Ora Hou, who manage the Skatepark, donated soft drinks and the Skatepark contributed extra workers in the form of young skaters who were intrigued by the project and happy to help spread bark around plants and collect rubbish.

“We didn’t have the usual family groups, but rangatahi from the Skatepark certainly got into the mahi," Mr Akuhata-Brown said.

"This project has always been about a wide range of people helping out with donations and work whenever they can. With the help of our supporters and volunteers, we expect to keep going until the awa no longer needs our help.”

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