Teeing up a bioblitz for Sunday

PUTTING FOR NATURE: Volunteer Naturewatch expert Mark Tutty and Department of Conservation community engagement supervisor Charles Barrie check out a green ahead of a community bioblitz this Sunday at Poverty Bay Golf Club. Picture by Liam Clayton

POVERTY Bay Golf Club is opening up its fairways for a community bioblitz this Sunday, with free golf lessons for those who go along.

In a collaboration between the golf club, Department of Conservation, Tairawhiti Environment Centre and Naturewatch expert volunteers, the bioblitz will involve finding out what birds, bugs, plants and pests are living at the club.

A bioblitz is an intense period of biological surveying aimed at recording all the living species within a designated area.

The open event will also explore how the course connects with the wider landscape and what can be done to make it a better home for native creatures.

“The golf club and board membership appreciate how we sit in the wider community and want to make sure we contribute to the biodiversity in the district,” PBGC manager Dave Keown said.

“There are things we can do here that benefit the district from a holistic point of view.”

The golf course already provides habitat to native species and birds, including New Zealand falcon/karearea and tui, along with many wetland birds.

“Through this we will become aware of what we have and what we have not got,” Mr Keown said. “We want to look at what we can do to maintain and enhance the habitat.”

An area of pine was recently cleared, establishing a view towards Young Nick’s Head (Te Kuri a Paoa), and the club was deciding what to plant there, he said.

“We want to keep in with the native flora and fauna that once were here.”

Snapshot of biodiversity

DoC community engagement supervisor Charles Barrie said the bioblitz would help take a “snapshot” of the biodiversity on the golf course.

“It gives the club a baseline to see what actions it can take to help with biodiversity.

“The club is part of a bigger landscape. There are wetland birds there that are part of a network from Hawke’s Bay through to up the Coast.”

The observations will be recorded using the Naturewatch online tool designed to promote citizen science.

“We want to develop more citizen scientists and encourage people to spend time outdoors, so we see this as a good opportunity,” Mr Barrie said.

Mr Barrie said along with many birds, they were hoping to find katipo, an endangered species of spider native to New Zealand.

“They exist in dune environments and we believe there might be some in the golf course area.”

A barbecue and golf lesson will follow the bioblitz.

“It might appeal to golfers who want to learn a bit more about the biodiversity of the course, and also those who are interested in biodiversity, who might also want to have a go at golf,” Mr Barrie said.

“It is something fun and quirky.”

The bioblitz is on Sunday at Poverty Bay Golf Club off Lytton Road from 3-5pm.

The barbecue and a discussion will be followed by a golf lesson from 6-7pm.

The bioblitz data will be recorded at http://naturewatch.org.nz/projects/poverty-bay-golf-club-bioblitz-2017

Those who can't make it on Sunday can still record findings on the website.

POVERTY Bay Golf Club is opening up its fairways for a community bioblitz this Sunday, with free golf lessons for those who go along.

In a collaboration between the golf club, Department of Conservation, Tairawhiti Environment Centre and Naturewatch expert volunteers, the bioblitz will involve finding out what birds, bugs, plants and pests are living at the club.

A bioblitz is an intense period of biological surveying aimed at recording all the living species within a designated area.

The open event will also explore how the course connects with the wider landscape and what can be done to make it a better home for native creatures.

“The golf club and board membership appreciate how we sit in the wider community and want to make sure we contribute to the biodiversity in the district,” PBGC manager Dave Keown said.

“There are things we can do here that benefit the district from a holistic point of view.”

The golf course already provides habitat to native species and birds, including New Zealand falcon/karearea and tui, along with many wetland birds.

“Through this we will become aware of what we have and what we have not got,” Mr Keown said. “We want to look at what we can do to maintain and enhance the habitat.”

An area of pine was recently cleared, establishing a view towards Young Nick’s Head (Te Kuri a Paoa), and the club was deciding what to plant there, he said.

“We want to keep in with the native flora and fauna that once were here.”

Snapshot of biodiversity

DoC community engagement supervisor Charles Barrie said the bioblitz would help take a “snapshot” of the biodiversity on the golf course.

“It gives the club a baseline to see what actions it can take to help with biodiversity.

“The club is part of a bigger landscape. There are wetland birds there that are part of a network from Hawke’s Bay through to up the Coast.”

The observations will be recorded using the Naturewatch online tool designed to promote citizen science.

“We want to develop more citizen scientists and encourage people to spend time outdoors, so we see this as a good opportunity,” Mr Barrie said.

Mr Barrie said along with many birds, they were hoping to find katipo, an endangered species of spider native to New Zealand.

“They exist in dune environments and we believe there might be some in the golf course area.”

A barbecue and golf lesson will follow the bioblitz.

“It might appeal to golfers who want to learn a bit more about the biodiversity of the course, and also those who are interested in biodiversity, who might also want to have a go at golf,” Mr Barrie said.

“It is something fun and quirky.”

The bioblitz is on Sunday at Poverty Bay Golf Club off Lytton Road from 3-5pm.

The barbecue and a discussion will be followed by a golf lesson from 6-7pm.

The bioblitz data will be recorded at http://naturewatch.org.nz/projects/poverty-bay-golf-club-bioblitz-2017

Those who can't make it on Sunday can still record findings on the website.

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